Aug 11, 2020  
2020-2021 General Catalog 
    
2020-2021 General Catalog

General Student Policies and Procedures



Davidson County Community College is committed to helping students reach their full academic potential and to preparing them for success in their careers and further academic pursuits. The College has adopted policies that are intended to help students achieve their educational goals. Each student is expected to make satisfactory progress toward reaching those goals.

Policies and Procedures Update

In 2019, DCCC began a review of existing policies and procedures.  This review and revision process will continue into 2020. Throughout this process, faculty, staff, and our Board of Trustees are working together to ensure the college’s policies and procedures align to state and federal law, state board code, and are revised or newly developed to guide our work and ensure the success of the students we serve.  Go to the DCCC Policies and Procedures Web Page (opens in new window) for more information on these policies.

ADMISSIONS POLICY 5.1.1

The College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, gender, gender identity or expression, pregnancy, age, national origin, disability, political affiliation, sexual orientation, genetic information or military/veteran status in any of its activities or operations.

  1. Open Door Admissions

Except as otherwise specified herein, the College maintains an open-door admission policy to all applicants who are legal residents of the United States and who are high school graduates or are at least eighteen (18) years of age. The College shall not solicit or use information regarding the accreditation of a secondary school located in North Carolina that a person attended as a factor affecting admission to the College or to any program of study, loans, scholarships or other educational activity at the College unless the accreditation was not conducted by a State agency. For purposes of this Policy, the term “accreditation” shall include certification or any other similar approval process. Student admission processing and placement determination shall be performed by College officials. Admission requirements for an emancipated minor shall be the same as for an applicant who is eighteen (18) years old or older. Non-emancipated minors may be admitted and allowed to attend the College pursuant to 1D SBCCC 200.95.

The open-door policy does not mean there are no restrictions on admission into specific College programs. Students may be admitted into specific College programs when they demonstrate aptitude for these programs. Criteria such as academic background, placement assessment and personal interviews may be used in this determination.

For more specific information regarding certain admissions criteria, see Procedure 5.1.1.1.

  1. Admissions Denials
    1. Basis for Denials
  1. Suspension/Expulsion from another Educational Entity.

If the College suspends or expels a student for non-academic disciplinary purposes, the College shall record the suspension or expulsion in the student’s educational record. Upon receipt of a written request signed by the student and subject to all applicable privacy laws, the College shall, in accordance with the student’s request, inform other colleges and universities of the term and circumstances of the student’s non-academic disciplinary suspension or expulsion, if any. The College reserves the right to refuse admission to any applicant during any period of time that the applicant is under a period of suspension or expulsion from another educational entity for non-academic disciplinary reasons.

  1. Safety Concern.

The College reserves the right to refuse admission to any applicant if it is necessary to protect the safety of the applicant or other individuals. When making a safety determination, the College may refuse admission to an applicant when there is an articulable, imminent and significant threat to the applicant or other individuals. When refusing admission based on safety concerns, the Student Conduct Officer shall document:

  1. Detailed facts supporting the rationale for denying admission;
  2. The time period within which the refusal to admit shall be applicable and the supporting rationale for the designated time period; and
  3. The conditions upon which the application that is refused would be reconsidered.
  4. The process for appeal.
  1. Residency for Distance Learning.

The College is not authorized to provide distance learning courses outside of North Carolina unless state authorization has been granted from the state in which the applicant resides. State authorization requires colleges to seek and secure authorization to offer instruction in that state.

Admission of applicants residing outside of North Carolina to an on-line degree, diploma, certificate program or individual on-line courses offered by the College is dependent on the College’s ability to secure authorization from the applicant’s state of residence.

State authorization does not affect the cost of attending the College. Tuition requirements, including those for out-of-state students, still apply. This requirement does not apply to non-credit continuing education courses.

  1. Undocumented Immigrants.

An undocumented immigrant is any immigrant who is not lawfully present in the United States. The College shall not admit undocumented immigrants into college-level curriculum courses unless all of the following conditions apply:

  1. The undocumented immigrant attended and graduated from a United States public high school, private high school or home school that operates in compliance with State or local law.
  2. The undocumented immigrant must comply with all federal and state laws concerning financial aid.
  3. The individual shall not be considered a North Carolina resident for tuition purposes and must be charged out-of-state tuition regardless of whether the individual resides in North Carolina. In instances where the individual is sponsored by an employer, in-state tuition is charged.
  4. When considering whether to admit the individual into a specific program of study, the College may take into account federal laws.
  5. Students lawfully present in the United States may have priority over any undocumented immigrant in any class or program of study when capacity limitations exist.
  1. Unsettled Financial Obligations.

The College reserves the right to refuse admission or readmission to a former student who has unsettled financial obligations.

  1. Criminal Justice Education and Training Sponsorship.

The College requires students enrolled in courses mandated under N.C.G.S.§17C and 17E, the North Carolina Criminal Justice Education and Training Standards Commission or the North Carolina Sheriffs’ Education and Training Standards Commission to be sponsored by law enforcement agencies until completion of the program. The student must be sponsored by a law enforcement agency to be admitted into the program. Failure to have such sponsorship shall result in an admission’s denial.

  1. Non-Criminal Justice Education and Training Firearm Courses.

Except for courses governed by Criminal Justice Education and Training, if the College has a program that requires students to possess a firearm, prior to admission, the student must provide proof of eligibility to possess firearms. For purposes of this Policy, “firearm” means a handgun, shotgun or rifle that expels a projectile by action of an explosion; “proof of eligibility” means: i) a current, valid State-issued permit to purchase a firearm; ii) a current, valid State-issued concealed carry permit from North Carolina; iii) a current, valid State-issued concealed carry permit from a state with a reciprocal concealed carry agreement with North Carolina; iv)proof of an exemption from permit requirements pursuant to N.C.G.S. § 14-415.25; or v) a background check to determine whether the applicant can lawfully possess a firearm in North Carolina pursuant to N.C.G.S. §§ 14-269.8; -404(c); -415.1; -415.3; and -415.25. 

  1. Appeal for Admissions Denials

If an applicant is denied admissions to the College for any of the reasons specified in Section II(A) (1)-(7), within five (5) calendar days following the receipt of the reasons specifying the denial, the applicant may file a written appeal with the Appropriate Vice President for a reconsideration. The written appeal shall contain the applicant’s reasons why he/she should be admitted and shall include any supporting documentation. The Vice President will communicate with the applicant and provide the applicant an opportunity to respond. Within ten (10) calendar days from receipt of the applicant’s written appeal, the Vice President shall make his/her determination and provide the applicant with a written response. The Vice President’s decision is final.

Adopted: April, 2020

Legal Reference: 1D SBCCC 200.95 and 400.2; NC Community College Written Memoranda CC10-026 (issued 7/12/10)

GENERAL ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES PROCEDURE 5.1.1.1

Admission to the College does not guarantee immediate acceptance to the curriculum program desired by the applicant. Admission to certain programs may have additional specific entrance requirements. Students may have to complete basic skills or requisite courses before being accepted into their desired academic curriculum program.

The Director, Recruitment & Admissions administers all admissions requirements and enforces all College admission policies and procedures.

  1. Curriculum Programs
    1. Certificate, Diploma and Degree Seeking Applicants

For curriculum certificate, diploma and degree seeking applicants, all applicants must:

  1. Submit a completed application for admission.
  2. Demonstrate readiness for college level courses.
  3. Official transcripts from any previously attended institution of higher education are required for transfer credit to be awarded.
  4. Returning students who are eligible for readmission and who have not been enrolled at the College for two (2) consecutive academic semesters must update the admission’s application and residency classification prior to registration. The student is required to meet the curriculum requirements in effect at the time of readmission according to the current College catalog.

Students who have been placed on academic or disciplinary suspension must fulfill the terms of their suspension before being considered for readmission. Students on disciplinary suspension must also submit a letter and any supporting documentation to the Student Conduct Officer requesting readmission. Students readmitted to the College after suspension will automatically be placed on probation for a period of one semester.

  1. Non-Degree Seeking Applicants

Non-degree seeking students are those students who enroll in one or more courses but do not desire to graduate from the College. The student may register for any course which is open to all students and does not require a requisite. However, if a student plans to register for a course that requires a requisite course, the student must demonstrate competence for that course. Students may not register for courses in a program that has a waiting list or restricted admission (such as nursing).

Non-degree seeking students are not eligible for financial aid or veterans benefits nor are they permitted to earn any degree, diploma or certificate awarded by the College. 

  1. Continuing Education Programs

For applicants seeking admission to a continuing education program, all applicants must complete the College’s continuing education registration process and pay the applicable tuition and institutional fees.

Adopted: April, 2020

HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT ENROLLMENT PROCEDURE 5.1.1.2

  1. Enrollment of High School Students

The College provides seamless opportunities for high school students to get a head start with their college education by enrolling in eligible pathways through Career and College Promise (“CCP”). Enrollment in identified courses is available to students enrolled in public and private schools and home schools.

High School Pathways

Career and College Promise (CCP) provides seamless dual enrollment educational opportunities for eligible North Carolina high school students to accelerate completion of college certificates, diplomas and associate degrees that lead to college transfer or provide entry‐level job skills. The College may offer the following CCP pathways aligned with the K‐12 curriculum, career and college ready standards adopted by the State Board of Education:

  1. College Transfer Pathway, leading to a college transfer certificate requiring the successful completion of thirty-two (32) semester hours of college transfer courses, including English and mathematics;
  2. Career and Technical Education Pathway, leading to a certificate or diploma; and
  3. Cooperative Innovative High School Pathway.
  4. Career and Technical Education and Workforce Continuing Education leading to a state or industry recognized credential.

Tuition is waived for CCP students; however, all CCP students taking classes with the College, except for those in Cooperative Innovative High School Programs, may be required to purchase their own textbooks and supplies required for their classes. Transportation for high school students will not be provided by the College.

The College will develop specific and uniform admission criteria and program requirements for CCP enrollment.

  1. Exclusive College Programs for Minors

Unless they are participating in a CCP program, the College cannot offer enrollment options for students who are under the age of sixteen (16) unless they have earned a high school diploma.

Adopted: April, 2020

Legal Reference: N.C. Session Law 2011-145, § 7.1A(a)-(l); Article 15, Part 9, Chapter 115C of the N.C.G.S. - Cooperative Innovative High School Programs; 1D SBCCC 200.95

BASIC LAW ENFORCEMENT TRAINING PROCEDURE 5.1.1.3

 The North Carolina Basic Law Enforcement Training (“BLET”) is a State accredited program designed to prepare entry level individuals with the cognitive and physical skills to become certified law enforcement officers.

To be accepted into the College’s BLET program, students must meet the following criteria:

  1. Must complete a BLET application.
  2. Must be at least 20 years of age or older.
  3. Must be a citizen of the United States of America.
  4. Must be a high school graduate or have earned a high school equivalency (high school diplomas earned through correspondence enrollment are not recognized toward educational requirements).
  5. Must provide a medical examination report, properly completed by a physician licensed to practice medicine in North Carolina, a physician’s assistant, or a nurse practitioner, to determine the applicant’s fitness to perform the essential job functions of a criminal justice officer.
  6. Must take a standardized reading comprehension test and score at the tenth-grade level or higher within one year prior to entrance into the BLET program.
  7. Must provide a certified criminal record check for local and state records for the time period since the applicant had become an adult and from all locations where the applicant has resided since becoming an adult. An Administrative Office of the Courts criminal record check or a comparable out-of-state criminal record check will satisfy this requirement.
  8. Must have not been convicted of a felony or:
    1. a crime for which the punishment could have been imprisonment for more than two years; or
    2. a crime or unlawful act defined as a “Class B misdemeanor” within the five year period prior to the date of application for employment unless the applicant intends to seek certification through the North Carolina Sheriffs’ Education and Training Standards Commission; or
    3. four or more crimes or unlawful acts defined as “Class B Misdemeanors” regardless of the date of conviction; or
    4. four or more crimes or unlawful acts defined as “Class A Misdemeanors” except the trainee may be enrolled if the last conviction occurred more than two years prior to the date of enrollment; or
    5. a combination of four or more “Class A Misdemeanors” or “Class B Misdemeanors” regardless of the date of conviction unless the individual intends to seek certification through the North Carolina Criminal Justice Education and Training Standards Commission.
  9. Every individual who is admitted as a trainee in the BLET program shall notify the BLET of all criminal offenses which the trainee is arrested for or charged with, pleads no contest to, pleads guilty to or is found guilty of, and all Domestic Violence Orders (N.C.G.S. § 50B) which are issued by a judicial official and which provide an opportunity for both parties to be present.

The notifications must be received by the College within thirty (30) days of the date the case was disposed of in court.

Adopted: April, 2020

Reference: NCDOJ Basic Law Enforcement Training (opens in new window)

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS PROCEDURE 5.1.1.4

The College welcomes students from all over the world. An international student is defined as a person seeking admission to the College who is not a U.S. citizen and requires a student visa.

  1. Requirements and Responsibilities
    1. International students are required to observe the United States Department of Homeland Security’s regulations as well as the College’s regulations.
    2. International students are only eligible to enroll at the start of a fall or spring term.
    3. A person holding a student visa cannot be classified as a North Carolina resident for tuition purposes.
    4. The College is required to enroll all F-1 International Students in the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS).
    5. The College is not authorized to issue I-20 forms or accept I-20 transfer students for F-1 International Students for High School Equivalency programs, English as a Second Language programs or certain curriculum programs. For a complete list of eligible programs, consult the Admissions or Student Records Office.
    6. F-1 International Students must submit evidence of adequate financial resources which include tuition, fees, and living expenses for one academic year. The documentary evidence must be in the form of either a bank statement signed by a bank official or a letter on official bank letterhead signed by a bank official. This documentation must be in English and converted to US dollars. If the student is being sponsored, then the sponsor should also complete an F-1 Student Guarantee of Financial Support form(available from the Admissions or Student Records Office).
    7. The College requires F-1 International Students to meet its English language requirement before receiving the I-20. Refer to International Student Procedures available in the College Admissions and Student Records offices.
    8. Students who have attended a college or university outside the United States must have their transcripts evaluated by a National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES) recognized member before they can be reviewed for possible transfer credit. Evaluation of foreign transcripts by a NACES recognized member does not guarantee transfer credit will be granted. See Policy 5.1.2 -Acceptance of Transfer Students/Credit.
    9. F-1 students may be required to provide additional documentation or information in order to complete their SEVIS record and be issued the I-20.

Adopted: April, 2020

ACCEPTANCE OF TRANSFER STUDENTS/CREDIT POLICY 5.1.2

  1. Course work transferred or accepted for credit toward an undergraduate degree must represent collegiate course work relevant to the degree with course content and level of instruction resulting in student competencies at least equivalent to those of students enrolled in the College’s undergraduate degree program.
  2. Any such earned credit must meet the minimum College academic standards of a grade of “C” or better and must parallel the content of similar courses offered. The maximum amount of credit allowed to be transferred is seventy five percent (75%) of the program credential requirements. Transfer credit is not calculated into the student’s grade point average.

For all others, the following criteria will be considered in determining the acceptability of the transfer course work:

1. Accreditation of the school by a regional or national accrediting body recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). Accreditation does not guarantee acceptance of transfer credit.

2. Equivalency of course descriptions, outcomes and analysis of course level, content, quality, comparability, and degree program relevance. It shall be the student’s responsibility to provide documentation of this equivalency, which may include, but is not limited to, syllabi, course catalogs, course outcomes, etc.

3. Use of recognized guides, such as those published by the American Council on Education, the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers and the National Association of Foreign Student Affairs.

4. For skills-based courses, particularly those in the advanced technology programs, demonstration of student skills may be a component of the evaluation process. Once a course is approved for transfer from a particular school, the course will be entered on a master list maintained by the Student Affairs Registrar. Work Based Learning courses, and other courses as identified by program criteria and maintained in the Student Records Office, will be evaluated to see if credit will be awarded

  1. The responsibility for determining transfer credit from other colleges and universities rests with the Registrar. When there is doubt about the appropriateness of transfer credit or when a student wishes to appeal a transfer credit decision, the transcript will be referred to the appropriate faculty member(s) and academic administrator, whose decision will be final. In such cases, the Registrar will note the decision in the student’s academic file. Time limits may be imposed in certain situations, such as for allied health program courses. The Registrar and the appropriate academic administrator will maintain a list of courses that have time limits for transfer.
  1. The College recognizes the following additional opportunities for awarding transfer credits:
    1. College Board Advanced Placement Program (“AP”): College course credit will be granted to students who pass the AP examinations with a score of three, four or five. Students must submit a College Action Report to the Student Records office for consideration of granting college credit.
    2. College-Level Examination Program (“CLEP”): College course credit will be granted to students who participate in CLEP Subject Examinations and achieve the minimum passing score as recommended by the American Council on Education. Students must submit a CLEP transcript to the Student Records office for consideration of granting college credit.
    3. DSST (Formerly DANTES): College course credit will be granted to students who achieve the minimum score for DSST examinations following the guidelines set by the American Council on Education.
    4. Non-curriculum to Curriculum Transfer Credit: Non-curriculum course work from the College, including continuing education courses, related to curriculum instruction may be transferred or accepted for credit towards curriculum courses in specific programs. Students must demonstrated satisfactory completion or successfully passed the applicable credentialing exam. The appropriate academic administrator for each discipline will approve non-curriculum course material prior to officially granting curriculum credit. Faculty teaching courses for which CE to CU credit may be awarded must meet all SACSCOC credential requirements.
    5. Career and Technical Education (CTE). Students who successfully completed high school Career and Technical Education courses may receive credit for Davidson County Community College courses that cover the same content or skills development as identified by statewide or local articulation agreements. Students must have received a grade of “B” or higher in their high school course and have achieved a grade of “A” on the standardized CTE assessment. To receive credit, students must enroll at the community college within two years of their high school graduation.
  2. Students who have attended a college or university outside the United States must have their transcripts evaluated by a National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES) recognized member before they can be reviewed for possible transfer credit. Evaluation of foreign transcripts by a NACES member does not guarantee transfer credit will be granted.
  3. The President is authorized to develop procedures to implement the provisions of this policy. The President may also authorize the granting of college credit from other sources, not listed above, that is either approved by the Southern Association of Colleges and School Commission on Colleges or generally accepted by universities and community colleges in North Carolina.

Adopted: April, 2020

Cross Reference: Policy 5.1.4 Credit By Examination and Joint Services Transcript

ACCEPTANCE OF TRANSFER STUDENTS/CREDIT PROCEDURE 5.1.2.1

  1. The responsibility for determining transfer credit from other colleges and universities rests with the Registrar. When there is doubt about the appropriateness of transfer credit or when a student wishes to appeal a transfer credit decision, the transcript will be referred to the appropriate faculty member(s) and Academic Administrator, whose decision will be final. In such cases, the Dean will note the decision in the student’s academic file. Time limits may be imposed in certain situations, such as for allied health program courses. Student Services and the appropriate Dean will maintain a list of courses that have time limits for transfer.
  2. When a student transfers from a postsecondary institution to the College, the following steps will be implemented:
    1. The student fills out an application for admission and is responsible for providing an official transcript from the postsecondary institution. The student should allow at least one month for the transcript evaluation process prior to registering for classes.
    2. The Registrar evaluates the transcript and credit is accepted in accordance with the College’s program offerings and the procedure stated herein. No credit for a course with a grade lower than a “C” may be transferred. The Registrar may consult with the appropriate academic administrator in the program of study and/or the Vice President, Academic Affairs for final decisions.
    3. The student demonstrates competence for college-level work.
    4. The student continues with registration procedure.
  3. The College recognizes the following additional opportunities for awarding transfer credits:
    1. College Board Advanced Placement Program (“AP”): College course credit will be granted to students who pass the AP examinations with a score of three, four or five. Students must submit a College Action Report to the student services office for consideration of granting college credit.
    2. College-Level Examination Program (“CLEP”): College course credit will be granted to students who participate in CLEP Subject Examinations and achieve the minimum passing score as recommended by the American Council on Education. Students must submit a CLEP transcript to the Student Services office for consideration of granting college credit.
    3. Educational Experiences in the Armed Services: Servicemen and veterans may be awarded college credit for service schools they have attended. The service schools must be accredited by a regional accrediting agency. Before applying for credit, contact the service school(s) and ask them to which regional accrediting agency they belong. Contact Student Services for more information.
    4. Non-curriculum to Curriculum Transfer Credit: Non-curriculum course work from the College, including continuing education courses, related to curriculum instruction may be transferred or accepted for credit towards curriculum courses in specific programs. Students must have earned a minimum letter grade of a “C”, passed the final assessment with a proficiency of 70% or better or successfully passed the applicable credentialing exam. The appropriate Academic Administrator for each division will approve non-curriculum course material prior to officially granting curriculum credit. Faculty teaching courses for which CE to CU credit may be awarded must meet all SACSCOC credential requirements.
    5. Career and Technical Education (CTE). Students who successfully completed high school Career and Technical Education courses may receive credit for Davidson County Community College courses that cover the same content or skills development as identified by statewide or local articulation agreements. Students must have received a grade of “B” or higher in their high school course and achieved a grade of “A” on the standardized CTE assessment. To receive credit, students must enroll at the community college within two years of their high school graduation.
  4. Students who have attended a college or university outside the United States must have their transcripts evaluated by World Education Services (WES) before they can be reviewed for possible transfer credit. Evaluation of international transcripts by WES does not guarantee transfer credit will be granted.

Adopted: April, 2020

FINANCIAL AID AND SCHOLARSHIPS POLICY 5.1.3 

College provides the opportunity for all students to apply for certain types of financial aid programs. The College administers scholarship opportunities for their students. The College administers the financial aid programs and scholarship opportunities in accordance with all applicable laws, rules and regulations. Requirements and critical dates for receiving financial aid (and/or scholarships through the College’s Foundation) are outlined on the College’s website.

Adopted: April, 2020

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION AND JOINT SERVICE TRANSCRIPT POLICY 5.1.4

  1. Credit by Examination

Advance placement is offered to students who, because of their demonstrated abilities, are qualified to accelerate their studies. To earn advanced placement, a student may take a proficiency examination in most subject areas which he/she can demonstrate a mastery of theory and practical application. A list of courses and/or subject areas which are not suitable nor allowable for proficiency exams may be obtained from the Registrar’s Office.

The following guidelines apply for Credit by Examination requests:

  1. The student must register for the course for which the credit by examination has been requested.
  2. Credit earned by proficiency examination will be entered on the student’s transcript as credit hours passed if a grade of “C” or higher on the exam is achieved. A grade of CE will be awarded but no quality point value will be assigned. Credit earned by proficiency examination will not be used in determining grade point average (GPA).
  3. Applicants must be enrolled in a program of study at the College. All prerequisites must be met where applicable.
  4. Proficiencies may not approved for Summer Term.
  5. Tuition and fees paid to take a challenge examination are nonrefundable, regardless of whether credit is awarded.

For credit by examination, full-time students enrolled in sixteen (16) credit hours or more are exempt from additional tuition charges; however, students enrolled in less than sixteen (16) credit hours must pay the Business Office the tuition required by the state for each semester hour credit; this fee is not refundable. A registration form must be completed in the Registrar’s Office after approval has been obtained to take a proficiency examination. Fees will be paid in the Business Office. Tuition and fees for credit by examination will not be eligible for financial aid or Veteran’s benefits.

  1. Joint Services Transcript Evaluation

Joint Services Transcript (“JST”) is an academically accepted document approved by the American Council on Education (“ACE”) to validate a service member’s military occupational experience and training along with the corresponding ACE college credit recommendations. When the College receives an official copy of a JST, the Registrar will review and apply appropriate course credit. The appropriate academic administrator will be consulted if there is need for further discussion regarding proposed course credit.

Adopted: April, 2020

Cross Reference: Policy 5.1.2 - Acceptance of Transfer Students and Credit

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION AND JST PROCEDURE 5.1.4.1

  1. Procedure

The following procedure will serve as guidelines in making application for all proficiency examinations:

  1. The following persons will not be permitted to take proficiency examinations.
    1. Persons who have taken the proficiency examination previously.
    2. Persons who have either enrolled in and/or dropped from the course.
    3. Persons who were enrolled in and failed the course.
    4. Persons who have a cumulative grade point average less than 2.5.
  2. The student should apply to take an examination with his or her advisor by completing the requisite application. The application must include evidence of previous experience or training that indicates probable success on the examination and obtain their signatures.
  3. The application should be submitted to the Registrar. Application must be made during the drop/add period, and if approved, students are required to register for the exam during the drop/add period and pay tuition for the course.
  4. Application approval will be forwarded to the appropriate Vice President for instructor assignment. Only full-time instructors may give proficiency exams.
  5. Upon approval of the application, an examination in theory and practicum (where applicable) will be given.
  6. After evaluation of the examination by the instructor, test results will be forwarded to the Registrar and the appropriate Assistant Vice President.
  7. Credit earned by proficiency examination will be entered on the student’s transcript as credit hours passed. No grade or quality point value will be assigned. Credit earned by proficiency examination will not be used in determining grade point average (GPA) or verification of enrollment.
  8. Applicants must be in a program of study. All prerequisites must be met where applicable.
  9. Proficiencies are not approved for Summer Term.
  10. Tuition and fees paid to take a challenge examination are nonrefundable, regardless of whether credit is awarded.

For credit by examination, full-time students enrolled in sixteen (16) credit hours or more are exempt from additional tuition charges; however, students enrolled in less than sixteen (16) credit hours must pay the Business Office the tuition required by the state for each semester hour credit; this fee is not refundable. A registration form must be completed in the Registrar’s Office after approval has been obtained to take a proficiency examination. Fees will be paid in the Business Office.

Adopted: April, 2020

ATTENDANCE POLICY 5.2.1

  1. ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS

The following attendance requirements shall apply to all College students:

  1. Students are expected to attend and be on time for all scheduled classes and labs. Students should refer to the course syllabus for individual course attendance requirements. At the instructors’ discretion, students may make-up work missed. When students must be absent, it is vital that they remain in contact with their instructors.
  2. Any student who has not attended at least one face-to-face class meeting or completed one assignment/activity for an online class by the date in which ten percent (10%) of the class has passed will be reported by the instructor as “never attended”. A student who has never attended a class by the ten percent (10%) date is no longer enrolled in the class and will not earn credit.
  3. The College provides two (2) excused absences each academic year, for religious observances required by a student’s religious practice or belief. Such religious observance requests must be in accordance with the procedures for this Policy and include the opportunity for the student to make up any tests or other work missed due to an excused absence for a religious observance. A request imposes responsibilities and obligations on both the College and the student requesting the absence. College faculty are required, as part of their responsibility to their students and the College, to adhere to this Policy and ensure its full and fair implementation by reasonably accommodating students’ religious practices or beliefs. Regardless of any request that may be granted, College students are responsible for satisfying all academic objectives, requirements and prerequisites as determined by their instructor and the College. For purposes of this section, the following definitions apply:
    1. Academic year: The sequence of fall, spring and summer semesters.
    2. Religious Observance Request: Any change in an academic course or program of study with respect to the way tasks or responsibilities are customarily done that enables a student to observe his/her religious practice or belief without creating an undue hardship.
    3. Religious practice or belief: A practice or observance that is sincerely held within the tenants of that religious belief.
    4. Undue hardship: An accommodation that would require significant expense or difficulty for the College or would result in the inability of the student to perform an essential function of his or her course/program of study. The determination of undue hardship is dependent on the facts of each individual situation.

Adopted: April, 2020

Legal Reference: N.C.G.S. § 115D-5(u); 1B SBCCC 500.99; 1G SBCCC 200.93

STUDENT CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURE 5.2.1.1

  1. A full-time student is a student enrolled in a given semester with twelve (12) or more semester hours of credit. Registration in excess of 20 credit hours witin a semester(10 hours in a single term), including contact hours or pre-curriculum courses, requires written permission of the student’s academic advisor and the appropriate Associate Dean. A part-time student is a student enrolled with fewer than twelve (12) semester hours of credit. For Financial Aid purposes, aid may be pro-rated if a student is enrolled with fewer than twelve (12) semester hours of credit. A freshman is a student who has earned fewer than 30 semester hours of credit and a sophomore is a student who has earned more than 30 hours of credit.
  2. A student enrolled in a College program and receiving Department of Veteran Affairs benefits is required to carry 12 credit hours in course work each semester in order to receive full educational benefits. Any student enrolled for 3/4 or 1/2 of the full-time requirements as mentioned above is eligible for proportionate compensation. Students enrolled less than 1/2 time are compensated for in-state tuition and fees only. Verification of attendance for veterans is required.

Adopted: April, 2020

Legal Reference: IG SBCCC 100.1

ABSENCE FOR RELIGIOUS OBSERVANCES PROCEDURE 5.2.1.2

  1. A student must complete the Religious Observance Request Form (opens in new window) and turn it to his/her instructor(s) prior to the census date (10% point) for the class. A student who submits the form after the census date must show good cause for the late submission and the late submission itself may be taken into account in determining whether the student has a religious practice or belief requiring accommodation and whether granting the request would create undue hardship. 
  2. The instructor and the student should discuss what a reasonable accommodation should include in all given cases. A student who is absent on days of examinations or class assignments due to a religious observance will have an opportunity to make up the work, without penalty, unless granting the make-up opportunity would create undue hardship.
  3. If the instructor and student agree, the request is then documented and shall be implemented.
  4. If the instructor denies the student request, or only agrees to provide an accommodation that is unsatisfactory to the student, the student and the instructor will meet with the Associate Dean. If the parties cannot reach a consensus, the student may file a written grievance directly to the Vice President, Academic Affairs (“Vice President”) within five calendar days after the meeting with the Associate Dean. The Vice President shall meet with the student, instructor and Associate Dean and hear from all parties regarding the student’s requested accommodations and make a written determination regarding the student’s request. The student may appeal the Vice President’s decision to the President within five (5) calendar days of receipt of the Vice President’s written determination. The President will conduct an “on the record” review and, at the President’s discretion, hear from the parties. The President will render a final decision. Where a timely request is made by the student but denied by the instructor, the grievance process shall be expedited as much as reasonably possible to ensure that a student pursuing a religious accommodation is not unduly disadvantaged by the passage of time.
  5. Excused absences from classes or examinations for religious observances do not relieve students from responsibility for any part of the course work required, or fulfilling required mandatory hours for completion during the period of absence. The instructor may appropriately respond if the student fails to satisfactorily complete any alternative assignment or examination.

Adopted: April, 2020

ABSENCES FOR MILITARY SERVICE MEMBERS PROCEDURE 5.2.1.3

The College shall allow any enrolled student who is in the United States Armed Forces, who has received temporary or permanent re-assignment as a result of military operations and a National Guard service member placed onto State active duty status during an academic term to be given an excused absence for the period of time the student is on active duty.

  1. The College shall provide the student the opportunity to make up any test or other work missed during the excused absence.
  2. The College shall give the student the option, when feasible, to continue classes and coursework during the academic term through online participation for the period of time the student is placed on active duty.
  3. The College shall give the student the option of receiving a temporary grade of “incomplete” for any course that the student was unable to complete as a result of being placed on State active duty status; however, the student must complete the course requirements within one (1) semester following their return from active service to avoid receiving a failing grade for the course.
  4. The College shall permit the student to drop, with no penalty, any course that the student was unable to complete as a result of being placed on State active duty status.

Adopted: April, 2020

Legal Reference: 1B SBCCC 500.1

COURSE SCHEDULE CHANGES POLICY 5.2.2

  1. Student Voluntary Withdrawal from Course(s)
  1. Ten Percent (10%) Date

A student may withdraw from a course for a partial refund on or before the official ten percent (10%) date of the semester. For more information on tuition/fee refunds, see Policy 6.1.4 - Tuition/Fee Refunds. In the case of withdrawal on or before the official ten percent date (10%) date of the semester, the withdrawn course(s) will not be included on the transcript.

  1. Seventy Five Percent (75%) Date

At any point prior to the seventy five percent (75%) date of the semester, a student may voluntarily withdraw from a course. Students will not be allowed to voluntarily withdraw from courses past the seventy five percent (75%) date. 

It is the student’s responsibility to withdraw from course(s) if he/she cannot meet the requirements of the course.

Students must officially withdraw from any course they stop attending in order to ensure that they will not receive an “F” in the course. In the case of a withdrawal, the student will receive a “W” which will not include the grade point average but will appear in the student’s official transcript.

  1. Exception to Seventy Five Percent (75%) Date

Students may not drop a course after the 75% date. However, medical withdrawals with proper documentation may be approved by the Registrar.

  1. Student Involuntary Withdrawal from Course(s)
    1. Students who register for a course and do not attend classes prior to ten percent (10%) will be dropped by the Registrar.
    2. Students may be involuntarily withdrawn from courses for disciplinary reasons subject to the student discipline policies. See policy - 5.3.2 Student Code of Conduct.
  2. Administrative Withdrawal from Course(s)
  1. In a situation in which a student is unable to complete the withdrawal process, or for documented administrative reasons, the College may withdraw the student from the student’s course(s).

Adopted: May, 2020

COURSE SCHEDULE CHANGE PROCEDURE 5.2.2.1

  1. Student Adding a Course(s)
  1. A student may add a course through the second day of the academic term. 
  1. Consult with an academic advisor for approval.
  2. If the course add request is approved, the academic advisor will add the course to the student’s schedule.
  1. A student may add a course after the second day through the census date of the academic term.
  1. Consult with an academic advisor
  2. The advisor submits the student’s request to the appropriate academic     administrator
  3. The academic administrator notifies the advisor of the outcome of the request and the advisor notifies the student.  If the course add request is approved, the academic administrator will notify the Student Records Office to add the course to the student’s schedule.  
  1. Student Withdrawal from Course(s)
    1. It is the student’s responsibility to withdraw from course(s) if he/she cannot meet the requirements of the course.

To officially begin the withdrawal process, the student should discuss with the faculty member his/her intent to withdraw from the course. After consult with the faculty member, if the student determines that a withdrawal is necessary, request that the faculty member initiate the course withdrawal process by submitting the electronic Drop Form. The student should then discuss with academic advising and if applicable, financial aid, the impact of the withdrawal on the student’s academic standing.

To complete the withdrawal process, the student must “Approve” the electronic Drop Form received in the student email account, which will submit the form to the Student Records Office for processing. Once processed, an email confirmation will be sent with a link to complete the online Withdrawal Survey.

Students must officially withdraw from any course they stop attending in order to ensure that they will not receive an “F” in the course. In the case of a withdrawal, the student will receive a “W” which will not include the grade point average but will appear in the student’s official transcript.

Withdrawing from course could substantially delay the completion of the student’s program of study and may have impacts on future financial aid eligibility.

  1. Exception to Seventy Five Percent (75%) Date

Students may drop a course after the 75% date. Medical withdrawals with proper documentation may be approved by the Registrar. To request a medical withdrawal, the student must submit a Medical Withdrawal Form (opens in new window) to the Registrar.

  1. Submit medical documentation supporting a request for a medical withdrawal before the last day of the following semester. Extenuating circumstances can be submitted to the registrar up through the last day of the current semester.
  2. The Registrar will review all submitted documentation and make a decision regarding voluntary medical withdrawal within ten (10) business days after the receipt of said documentation.
  3. Students who are granted medical withdrawals will receive the grade of “W” in all courses in progress and/or specified in the request.
  1. Student Involuntary Withdrawal from Course(s)
    1. Students who register for a course and do not attend classes prior to the census date will be dropped by the Registrar.
    2. Students may be involuntarily withdrawn from courses for disciplinary reasons subject to the student discipline policies.

Adopted: April, 2020

Legal Reference: IG SBCCC 100.1

AUDITING COURSES POLICY 5.2.3

A student wishing to attend a course without receiving a grade, academic credit, continuing education unit or certificate of completion in the course may audit provided they have not previously audited or taken the course unless approved by the appropriate academic administrator. Not all courses offered are available for audit. Any student may audit a College class based on the following:

  1. The student must officially register and pay the normal tuition and fees for the audited course. However, any person who is at least 65 years old may audit non-self-supporting basis courses without the payment of tuition or registration fee provided the individual meets the other criteria listed herein. Senior citizens shall pay any applicable local fees to audit a course section. A person 65 years or older shall pay the applicable self-supporting fee for enrollment or registration into a self-supporting course section. The grade SR will be recorded on the senior citizen’s transcript.
  2. Auditing students do not take tests or examinations, they do not receive grades, credit or financial aid, and cannot later change the “audit” to credit.
  3. Students auditing a course must meet the same course requisite and attendance standards as all other students in the course. Auditing a course will not meet the requisite of any sequential or higher-level course.
  4. Auditing is subject to open seats in the course and a student who audits a course shall not displace other students seeking to enroll in the course for credit.
  5. Students who audit a course and withdraw or are dropped from the course will be issued a grade of “W”.
  6. Students who desire to audit must inform their instructor at the first-class session, complete the appropriate forms and return them to the Registrar’s Office within the add a class period of the College.
  7. An audited course will appear on the student’s transcript as “AU”. For those students over 65-years of age, an audited course will appear on the grade report as “SR.”

Adopted: April, 2020

Legal Reference: 1D SBCCC 700.1; S.L. 2017-57

GRADING SYSTEM POLICY 5.2.4

  1. Student Evaluation

Methods of evaluation of a student’s work may differ widely from class to class and among faculty members. Evaluation instruments or methods should reflect the objectives of the College and the course being taught. Students will be informed during the first week of class of the requirements for the course, methods of evaluation and the way their final grade will be determined. Each instructor determines the relative value of each evaluation instrument to be used.

  1. Grading System

In order to keep students informed of academic progress, various grades are used. Courses for which quality points are not earned (pre-curriculum courses designed to assist the student in obtaining needed academic background) are taken on a Satisfactory (SA, SB or SC), Unsatisfactory (U), Pass (P) or Repeat (R) basis. Internship courses (courses designed to allow the student to gain meaningful cooperative occupational experiences in which the employer is involved in the student’s grading) are taken on a Pass/Fail (P/F) basis.

Grade Objectives and Quality Points
Grade A The student has, in a superior way, met the objectives established for the course. Quality Points = 4 per semester hour.
Grade B The student has more than adequately met the objectives established for the course. Quality Points = 3 per semester hour.
Grade C The student has adequately met the objectives established for the course. Quality Points = 2 per semester hour.
Grade D The student had minimally met the objectives established for the course. Quality Points = 1 per semester hour.
Grade F The student has failed to meet the objectives established for the course. Quality Points = 0 per semester hour.
Grade I The student has completed the major portion of the course and due to extenuating circumstances, has not been able to complete all the requirements. The student should be able to complete the course with minimal assistance from the instructor. Quality Points = 0 per semester hour. The student is responsible for contacting the instructor to make arrangements for completing the requirements for removing the “I” grade. If the student is unable to reach the instructor, the student should contact the instructor’s immediate supervisor, as indicated in the course syllabus. If the “I” grade is not removed by the end of the 12th week following the semester in which it was given, the grade will automatically be converted to a grade of “F”, unless an exception is approved due to extenuating circumstances.
Grade IE Consistent with assignment of the grade of I, as indicated above, Incomplete Emergency (IE) is used to document the student impact of an emergency situation broadly affecting the College, its service area, and student population (e.g. COVID-19 pandemic).  The grade of IE is assigned when the student has not been able to complete the course requirements in the semester enrolled, and needs additional time and/or support that may exceed the timeframe and/or support provided when a grade of “I” is assigned. Quality Points = no quality points awarded.
Grade SA The student has, in a superior way, met the objectives established for a pre-curriculum course. Quality Points = no quality points awarded.
Grade SB The student has more than adequately met the objectives established for a pre-curriculum course. Quality Points = no quality points awarded.
Grade SC The student has adequately met the objectives in a pre-curriculum course. Quality Points =no quality points awarded.
Grade U The student has failed to meet the objectives established in a pre-curriculum course. Quality Points = no quality points awarded.
Grade P The student met the objectives established for a pre-curriculum course or the student has met the objectives of a course, designated in the College’s catalog, as one in which students are graded Pass (P) or Fail (F). Quality Points = no quality points awarded.
Grade P1 The student has adequately met the objectives in a pre-curriculum course. Quality Points = no quality points awarded.
Grade P2 The student has adequately met the objectives in a pre-curriculum course. Quality Points = no quality points awarded.
Grade P3 The student has adequately met the objectives in a pre-curriculum course. Quality Points = no quality points awarded.
Grade R The student failed to meet the objectives established for the pre-curriculum course and must repeat the course. Quality Points = no quality points awarded.
Grade AU Grade assigned for an audit in a curriculum course. Quality Points = no quality points awarded.
Grade W The student withdrew prior to the 75% point of the course. Quality Points = no quality points awarded.
Grade WE A grade of Withdraw Emergency (WE) is assigned when a student is unable to complete course requirements due to an emergency situation broadly affecting the College, its service area, and student population (e.g. COVID-19 pandemic).  The grade of WE may be assigned by the College as a result of a student-initiated or administrative withdrawal to document the student impact of an emergency situation.  Quality Points = no quality points awarded.
Grade CE Grade assigned when the student receives credit for a course through challenge examination. Quality Points = no quality points awarded.
Grade CR Grade assigned when curriculum credit has been grated for students completing continuing education course. Quality Points = no quality points awarded.
Grade SR Grade assigned for students 65 year or older who choose to audit a course. Quality Points = no quality points awarded.
Grade S The student has satisfactorily met the objections in a continuing education course. Quality Points = no quality points awarded.
Grade N Grade assigned when student never attend a continuing education course. Quality Points = no quality points awarded.
Grade=CH The student has completed this number of contact hours in a continuing education course. Quality Points =no quality points awarded.
  1. Grade Point Average

Academic progress is based on a 4.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) system. Only courses completed at the College are calculated in the student’s GPA.

  1. A term GPA is calculated each semester and is used to determinate eligibility for Dean’s List and Academic Alert, Probation and Suspension.
  2. Program GPA is calculated using only the grades for courses included in the student’s program of study and is used to determine eligibility for graduation. A final Program GPA of 2.0 is required for graduation with a degree, diploma or certificate.
  3. Cumulative GPA is calculated using grades from every course the student has completed at the College and is used to determine Honors and High Honors upon graduation.

Students accumulate grade points based on grades earned per semester. The GPA is determined by dividing grade points earned by the number of semester credit hours attempted. The highest grade earned in a course will be used to calculate GPA.

  1. Grade Changes

Assigning grades to a student is the responsibility of the instructor of the course in which the student is registered. Once assigned, grades may be changed only when an authorization for the change is approved by the instructor or the appropriate academic administrator for the discipline area in which the course is taught. The change shall then be submitted to the Student Records Office. In cases where the instructor cannot be consulted, the instructor’s immediate supervisor, as identified in the course syllabus, will act in the instructor’s place.

  1. Grade Forgiveness

Students who return to the College after being away for a minimum of 36 consecutive months (three years) and wish to make a fresh start in pursuing educational goals may apply for grade forgiveness. Grade forgiveness allows for “F” or “WF” grades earned at the College three or more years prior to current enrollment to be eliminated from the program and cumulative GPA calculations. To qualify for grade forgiveness, a student must meet the following criteria:

  1. Not have been enrolled at the College for a minimum of three years prior to current enrollment.
  2. Be currently enrolled in curriculum courses.
  3. Have successfully completed a minimum of 12 semester hours of credit coursework with a grade of “C” of higher after returning to the College.

Additionally, the following provisions apply regarding grade forgiveness:

  1. Grades earned at other colleges cannot be forgiven.
  2. Students may apply for grade forgiveness one time during their academic career at the College.
  3. If the previous course is no longer being offered at the College and the student has successfully completed another course, that grade will be used as a substitute.
  4. Forgiven grades remain on the transcript but are not calculated in the program or cumulative GPA.

To request grade forgiveness, students are required to complete an Application for Grade Forgiveness and submit it to the Student Records Office. Students will be notified through their College email of the decision, and in cases of approval, GPA recalculation will be made.

Adopted: April, 2020

Revised: May, 2020

ACADEMIC EXPECTATIONS PROCEDURE 5.2.4.1

  1. Student Expectations of Faculty

The College faculty pledges to provide the highest level of service possible to all its students, all the time. To this end, it is reasonable for students to expect that faculty will:

  1. Provide a syllabus that outlines the content and objectives of the course and spells out the instructor’s grading and attendance policies.
  2. Be a professional and treat each student respectfully, equitably and honestly.
  3. Start class on time, be prepared and use effective teaching strategies to promote learning of the subject material activities for the full time allotted for all classes.
  4. Strive to create a positive environment in which students may pursue learning.
  5. Be accessible and approachable.
  6. Provide timely and consistent feedback regarding student progress.
  7. Provide reasonable assistance on an individual basis as may be necessary and appropriate.
  8. Preserve the academic integrity of the course.
  1. Faculty Expectations of Students

The College is an institution for adult learning. It is a partnership between instructors with the desire to teach and students with the desire to learn. To this end, faculty believe it is reasonable to expect that students will:

  1. Treat other students and faculty with respect and treat the classroom as a professional environment.
  2. Accept the challenge of collegiate studying, thinking, and learning.
  3. Anticipate that the level and quantity of work in some courses will exceed prior experiences.
  4. Be informed about instructors’ policies presented in the course syllabus as well as the College’s policies and procedures.
  5. Attend all classes (except in cases of emergencies or inclement weather).
  6. Adhere to class start times and end times that are prescribed.
  7. Be an active participant in class.
  8. Study course material routinely.
  9. Refrain from any behavior that may distract others.
  10. Silence communications devices in every class.
  11. Use the Internet for valid, academic purposes while in any campus computer lab.
  12. Transact personal business with the instructor (such as asking him or her to sign forms) before instruction begins or after class.
  13. Do not compromise or surrender personal integrity, ethics or morals.

Adopted: April, 2020

GRADE APPEAL POLICY 5.2.5

This Policy shall apply to grade appeals unrelated to issues pertaining to the Code of Student conduct. The grade appeal process applies only to final course grades.

  1. If a student asserts a final course grade is inaccurate, the student must first submit to the instructor who assigned the grade a written explanation of the rationale for challenging the course grade within five (5) business days after official receipt of that grade. The instructor will provide a written determination to the student within five (5) business days from receipt of the student appeal. If the instructor is no longer employed at the College, the student may proceed to step two.
  2. If the student is dissatisfied with the instructor’s determination, within five (5) business days thereafter, the student may submit a written appeal to the instructor’s immediate supervisor outlining the rationale for challenging the instructor’s determination. The instructor’s supervisor, in consultation with the Associate Vice President for Academic Programs & Services, will render a written decision to the student in five (5) business days.
  3. If the student is dissatisfied with the supervisor’s determination, within five (5) business days thereafter, the student may provide a written appeal to the Vice President for Academic Affairs (“Vice President”) addressing the rationale for challenging the determination provided by the instructor’s supervisor. The Vice President shall render a written decision to the student within five (5) business days. The decision of the Vice President is final.
  4. In circumstances where the student is appealing a grade for a course that is a prerequisite for a course in which the student is enrolled in the subsequent academic term, the student may waive the above process and request an expedited review of appeal. In such a case, the student may submit within five (5) business days following official receipt of the grade, a written appeal directly to the Vice President, Academic Affairs (“Vice President”) explaining the rationale for challenging the course grade. The Vice President will confer with the instructor and the instructor’s immediate supervisor, and will provide a written determination to the student prior to the first day of the subsequent academic term. The decision of the Vice President is final.
     

Adopted: April, 2020

ACADEMIC STANDARDS POLICY 5.2.6

Satisfactory academic progress is essential to student success. To be in good academic standing, a minimum term grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 is required of all students enrolled in certificate, diploma and associate degree programs. At the end of each academic term, students who have not attained or maintained a GPA of 2.0 will be notified. The Student Records Office manages the academic alert, probation and suspension process by notifying students of their academic status and academic advisors monitor students’ progress toward goals.

  1. Academic Alert - When a student’s term GPA first falls below a 2.0, the student will be placed on Academic Alert. Students will be notified to schedule an appointment with their academic advisor prior to registering for future semesters.
  1. Academic Probation - When a student’s term GPA remains below 2.0 for a second consecutive semester, the student will be placed on Academic Probation and will not be able to register for future semesters until the student meets with their academic advisor. Students receiving financial aid, foundations scholarships, and veterans’ benefits must also meet with a financial aid counselor to discuss eligibility.

A student on academic probation may not hold elected office or serve on College committees and may be limited to participation in student clubs and student organizations.

  1. Academic Suspension - When a student’s term GPA remains below a 2.0 for a third consecutive semester, the student will be placed on Academic Suspension and will not be allowed to continue courses at the College for a minimum of one fall or spring semester. The student will need to submit a readmission application prior to any subsequent enrollment.

A student may appeal the academic suspension by submitting a letter within 10 days of receiving the suspension notification to the Vice President, Academic Affairs.

Adopted: April, 2020

CURRICULUM REQUISITE POLICY 5.2.7

The purpose of a requisite is to ensure student success in subsequent coursework. While successful completion of prerequisites and/ or co-requisites is the traditional way students demonstrate readiness, in exceptional circumstances, students may demonstrate readiness through other means. In such cases, prerequisites or co-requisites may be waived with appropriate approvals and permission by the appropriate Academic Administrator. Documentation of the approved waiver will be maintained on file.

  1.  Pre-curriculum Placement

The College provides pre-curriculum courses for students to enhance their opportunities for educational success in regular college courses of study. The academic placement of a student is based upon the student’s academic record and the College placement process. Depending upon the student’s needs, goals, and the results of the College assessment process, the student may be advised to enroll in pre-curriculum courses designed to assist in developing the academic skills necessary for success in college-level courses.

  1. Student Success Course Policy

All first time, degree seeking, college students with an unweighted high school GPA less than 2.8 are required to complete a student success course in their first semester. If a student fails to complete the course in the first semester, he or she will be registered for it in the following term. If the course is not completed in the following term, the student must complete the student success course prior to enrolling in any additional courses.

Adopted: April, 2020

Legal Reference: 1D SBCCC 400.97; Numbered Memo CC06-269

REPEATING COURSES AND COURSE SUBSTITUTES POLICY 5.2.8

  1. REPEATING COURSES
    1. Curriculum Courses

Curriculum courses with earned grades of “C”, “D” or “F” may be repeated once. Courses with an earned grade of a “B” or higher may be repeated only by special permission from the appropriate Academic Administrator. When courses are repeated, the highest earned grade and hours will be computed in the cumulative grade point average. All course (grade and hours) will be shown on the transcript. Further attempts to repeat a course must be approved by the appropriate Academic Administrator.

  1. Continuing Education Courses

Students may enroll in continuing education courses as many times as necessary to accomplish their individual educational/training goals provided they continue to show progress, do not prohibit others from participating, are willing to pay fees, and do not violate North Carolina Community College System policy. Continuing Education programs/courses are designed to enable participants to progress, at their individual achievement rates, in gaining knowledge and skills in specific educational areas.

  1. COURSE SUBSTITUTES

When it is determined to be in the best interest of the student’s declared educational objective, appropriate courses may be substituted for other courses for graduation purposes. Necessary course substitutions within the major field (courses reflecting the prefix of the student’s major curriculum) require the approval of the appropriate Academic Administrator. Course substitutions from outside the student’s major area, which have been made for the purpose of addressing the general education or related course requirements, must be approved by the Academic Administrator. The Academic Administrator must notify the Student Record’s Office in writing of all applicable course substitutions on an individual student basis.

Adopted: April, 2020

CREDIT HOURS POLICY 5.2.9

The College provides instruction for each course based on the number of contact hours listed in the North Carolina Community College Combines Course Library (“CCL”) for the course. Instruction is delivered by a variety of methods, including traditional and online formats or a combination of both to meet the contact hour requirements.

A semester credit hour is an academic unit earned for no less than sixteen, 50-minute sessions of classroom instruction or its equivalent. This basic measure may be adjusted proportionately to reflect modified academic calendars and formats of study.

Laboratory, clinical and work experience courses from CCL convert from credit hours to contact hours per course using the following guidelines:

  1. Credit of one (1) semester hour is awarded for each 32 hours of experiential laboratory work. This consists of instruction given to a student by an instructor to increase the student’s knowledge and skills without immediate student application.
  2. Credit of one (1) semester hour is awarded for 48 hours of faculty directed laboratory work. This involves structured and coordinated demonstration by an instructor with immediate student application.
  3. Credit of one (1) semester hour is awarded for each 48 hours of clinical practice. This is structured, faculty-directed learning experience in a health science program which develops job proficiency. Clinical practice requires significant preparation, coordination and scheduling by the faculty and is under the supervision of an instructor or preceptor who is qualified for the particular program.
  4. Credit of one (1) semester hour is awarded for each 160 hours of work experience such as cooperative education, practicums and internships. Student activity in work experience is planned and coordinated by a College representative and the employer is responsible for the control and supervision of the student on the job.

Adopted: April, 2020

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS POLICY 5.2.10

A student who is not in continuous enrollment at the College or who changes from one major to another will graduate under the catalog in effect at the time of re-enrollment or major change. Continuous enrollment excludes the summer term.

Course requirements for a degree, diploma, or certificate will vary according to the curriculum. The student should refer to “My Progress” in Student Planning to identify the course requirements for graduation. It is the student’s responsibility to complete the Application for Graduation prior to the deadline listed on the student calendar during the semester in which they intend to graduate. Students who owe tuition, fees, and/or fines to the College may not participate in the commencement ceremony or receive official transcripts or the final credential until all balances are paid.

Students transferring to the College must pass at least 25% of the required semester hours of credit at the College in order to be eligible to graduate with a degree, diploma, or certificate. The 25% resident credit may not include transfer, CLEP, Advanced Placement or other forms of advanced standing credit.

The criteria will be used in determining the eligibility for graduation of a student at this institution:

  1. A candidate for a degree, diploma, or certificate must have successfully completed all credit hours as specified in the College catalog for a specific degree, diploma, or certificate.
  2. A candidate for a degree, diploma, or certificate must have completed all course work as set forth in the College catalog for a specific degree, diploma, or certificate. Course requirements may be waived or substitutions allowed within the provisions of the State Curriculum Standards.
  3. A candidate for a specific degree, diploma, or certificate must have earned at least a 2.0 grade point average. Only grades in those courses credited to the program for which they are to receive a degree, diploma, or certificate are included in the grade point average. When a student has more unrestricted elective hours than the program requires, the GPA will be calculated using elective courses with the highest grades for the specified number of unrestricted elective hours.

Graduation with Honors

The College recognizes students who have done outstanding scholastic work as honor graduates. Graduation with High Honors is granted to students in degree, diploma, and certificate programs who have achieved a cumulative grade point average of 3.8 or higher. Graduation with Honors is granted to students in degree, diploma, and certificate programs who have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.5 and less than 3.8. The determination of Honors or High Honors for a credential will be based upon the cumulative GPA at the time of completion.

Commencement Exercise

A commencement exercise to award degrees, diplomas, and certificates is held at the end of the spring semester. Students who meet graduation requirements at times other than the end of spring semester may participate in the commencement exercise the following spring. Students who have registered for the remaining courses needed to complete their diploma or degree requirements, excluding certificates, in the following summer term and have a maximum of two (2) courses to complete their credential may participate in the spring commencement ceremony. However, students will not receive the credential or have it noted on the transcript until all graduation requirements are completed. 

Adopted: April, 2020

OVERVIEW OF STUDENT RIGHTS POLICY 5.3.1

The following is an overview of basic student rights. For more specific information concerning these and other rights, students are directed to review the specific policy or procedure dealing with the issue of concern. The provisions and language contained in specific policies and procedures control over this Policy.

  1. Students are free to pursue their educational goals. The College shall provide appropriate opportunities for learning in the classroom and on the campus. Student performance will be evaluated solely on an academic basis and not on opinions or conduct in matters unrelated to academic standards. For more information regarding attendance and academic standards, see polices contained in the Policy Manual, Section 5.2 - Attendance and Academics Standards.
  2. Students have the right to freedom of expression, inquiry and assembly without restraint or censorship, subject to reasonable and non-discriminatory rules and regulations regarding time, place and manner.
  3. Students have the right to inquire about and to propose improvements in policies, regulations and procedures affecting the welfare of students through established student government procedures, campus committees and College offices.
  4. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (“FERPA”) provides safeguards regarding the confidentiality of and access to student records and the College shall adhere to the FERPA laws and regulations. Students and former students have the right to review their official records and to request an appeal if they challenge the contents of these records. No records shall be made available to unauthorized personnel or groups outside the College without the written consent of the student involved or if a legal exception applies. For more information, consult Policy 5.4.3 - Student Records - FERPA.
  5. No disciplinary sanctions, other than temporary removal from class or activity (only for duration of said activity) may be imposed upon any student without due process. For more information concerning student due process rights with respect to disciplinary situations, consult Policy 5.3.2 - Student Code of Conduct.
  6. Students have the right to voluntarily withdrawn from courses under certain criteria. For more information, consult Policy 5.2.2 - Withdrawal from Courses.
  7. Students have the right to be free from discrimination, harassment and sexual violence while attending the College and accessing the College’s programs and opportunities. For more information, consult Policy 5.3.4 - Discrimination and Harassment.

Adopted: April, 2020

STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT POLICY 5.3.2

The College makes every effort to maintain a safe and orderly educational environment for students and staff. Therefore, when, in the judgment of College officials, a student’s conduct disrupts or threatens to disrupt the College community, appropriate disciplinary action will be taken to restore and protect the sanctity of the community.

Students are expected to conduct themselves in accordance with generally accepted standards of scholarship and morality. The purpose of these standards is not to restrict student rights but to protect the rights of individuals in their academic pursuits.

The following regulation sets forth offenses for which disciplinary proceedings may be initiated. Violation of one or more of the following code provisions may result in one of the sanctions described in Procedure 5.3.2.1 - Discipline and Appeals Procedures for Academic-Related Violations and/or Procedure 5.3.2.2 - Discipline and Appeals Procedures for Non-Academic Related Violations.

  1. Academic-Related Violations
    1. Plagiarism - The intentional theft or unacknowledged use of another’s work or ideas. Plagiarism includes, but is not limited to: a) paraphrasing or summarizing another’s words or works without proper acknowledgment; b) using direct quotes of material without proper acknowledgment; or c) purchasing or using a paper or presentation written or produced by another person. If a student is uncertain about what constitutes plagiarism, he/she should discuss with the class instructor.
    2. Cheating - Using notes or other material on an exam or class work without permission from the class instructor; receiving information from another student during an exam; obtaining a copy of an exam or questions from an exam prior to taking the exam; submitting someone else’s work as one’s own; or having someone take one’s exam and submitting it as his/her own.
    3. Aiding Acts of Academic Dishonesty - Providing information to another student and knowing, or reasonably should have known, that the student intends to use the information for cheating or other deceptive purposes.
    4. Violations of Normal Classroom Behavior - Not complying with reasonable rules issued by an instructor, causing disruption in the classroom or being disrespectful to classmates or the instructor. The conduct must be objectively severe or pervasive enough that a reasonable person would agree that the conduct is disruptive or disrespectful not based on content or viewpoint discrimination.
  2. Non-Academic Related Violations
    1. Theft and Property Damage - Students shall not steal or damage College property or another individual’s property. Students who are caught stealing or damaging said property will be required to make restitution and may be eligible for civil or criminal prosecution as well as College discipline.
    2. Trespass to Property - Students are trespassing if in an unauthorized area of the College campus; present on the College campus after closing hours (without permission); or remaining on the College campus after having been directed to leave by a College official.
    3. Drugs and Alcohol - Unlawfully possessing, using, being under the influence of, manufacturing, dispensing, selling or distributing alcohol, illegal or unauthorized controlled substances or impairing substances at any College location. For more specific information, see Policy 5.3.5 - Students - Alcohol and Drugs on Campus. In addition, students may not use tobacco of any form or e-cigarettes on campus or at any College-affiliated activities or events.
    4. Lewd and Indecent Behavior - Students shall not engage in lewd or indecent behavior, including public physical or verbal action or distribution of obscene material based on reasonable community standards. The conduct must be objectively severe or pervasive enough that a reasonable person would agree that the conduct constitutes lewd and/or indecent behavior.
    5. Mental/Physical Abuse - Students shall not mentally or physically abuse any person on the College premises or at a College-supervised function, including verbal or physical actions which threaten or endanger the health or safety of any such persons.
    6. Assault - Students shall not assault or threaten to assault another person for any reason whatsoever. Assault includes a demonstration of force, unlawful physical touching or striking.
    7. Sexual Harassment and Sexual Violence. Students shall not engage in sexual harassment and/or sexual violence. For more specific information and definitions of prohibited activities, consult Procedure 5.3.4.1 - Sexual Harassment and Sexual Violence.
    8. Unlawful Discrimination. Students shall not engage in unlawful discrimination. For more specific information and definitions of prohibited activities, consult Procedure 5.4.3.2 - Unlawful Discrimination.
    9. Communicating Threats - Students shall not verbally, in writing, through a third party or by any other means threaten to physically injure another person or that person’s child, sibling, spouse or dependent, or willfully threaten to damage the property of another.
    10. Bullying - Students shall not intimidate or threaten with harm any other individual. Bullying is defined as any pattern of gestures or written, electronic or verbal communications, or any physical act or any threatening communication that takes place on the College premises or at any College sponsored function that: (a) places a person in actual and reasonable fear of harm to his or her property; or (b) creates, or is certain to create, a hostile environment by substantially interfering with or impairing a student’s educational performance, opportunities or benefits or a College’s employee’s ability to perform the essential functions of his/her job.
    11. Disorderly Conduct and Disruption - Students shall not obstruct or disrupt any teaching, research, administration or disciplinary proceedings, or other College activities, including public service functions, and other duly authorized activities on or off College premises. Students shall not occupy or seize, in any manner, College property, a College facility or any portion thereof for a use inconsistent with prescribed, customary, or authorized use. Students shall not participate in or conduct an assembly, demonstration or gathering in a manner which threatens or causes injury to person or property; which interferes with free access to, ingress or egress of College facilities; which is harmful, obstructive or disruptive to the educational process or institutional functions of the College; hold rallies, demonstrations, or any other forms of public gathering without prior approval of the College based on reasonable time, place and manner restrictions; remain at the scene of such an assembly after being asked to leave by a representative of the College staff.
    12. Possession of Weapons - Students may not have a weapon of any kind, including but not limited to, a knife, stun gun or any firearm in their possession on campus or at any College-affiliated activities or events except handguns as allowed by N.C.G.S. § 14-269.4. Handguns are permitted under these circumstances: a) the person has a concealed handgun permit that is lawfully issued; b) the handgun is in a closed compartment or container within the person’s locked vehicle; c) a person may unlock the vehicle to enter or exit the vehicle provided the handgun remains in the closed compartment at all times; and d) the vehicle is locked at all times.
    13. Tampering with Fire Alarms - Setting off a fire alarm or using or tampering with any fire safety equipment, except with reasonable belief in the need for such alarm or equipment.
    14. Gambling - Students may not gamble on campus or at any College-affiliated activities or events.
    15. Traffic Violations - Violation of College regulations regarding the operation and parking of motor vehicles.
    16. Providing False Information - Students shall not present to the College or its employees false information as part of an investigation, inquiry, hearing or in other matters related to College activities; neither may a student knowingly withhold information which may have an effect on their enrollment or their status with the College.
    17. Disobedience / Insubordination - Failure to comply with instructions of College officials acting in performance of their duties and failure to adhere to the terms of any discipline action.
    18. Financial Impropriety - Financial impropriety such as failure to pay College-levied fines, failure to repay College-funded loans, misuse or failure to properly account for club or student organization funds, or the passing of worthless checks, drafts or orders to College officials.
    19. Public Laws - Violations of any federal, state or local laws occurring while on campus may lead to legal actions as well as College discipline. Violations of federal, state or local laws occurring off campus may result in disciplinary action if the student’s continued presence on campus constitutes a threat to the safety and order of the campus.
    20. Failure to Report Criminal Activity - Failure to inform the College, in writing, within five (5) days after he or she is convicted for violation of any federal, state, or local criminal drug statue or alcoholic beverage control statute where such violation occurred while on a College location. For more information, see Policy 5.3.5 - Student Alcohol and Drugs on Campus.
    21. Unauthorized Access to College Records - Students may not access, view, copy or change official College records without expressed authority to do so.
    22. Animals on Campus - Students may not have an animal of any kind on campus. This includes animals left within a vehicle. Services animals are permitted and any student with a service animal should report the use of a service animal to the College’s Disability Services Coordinator. For more information regarding service animals, see Policy 5.4.5 - Service Animals and Other Animals on Campus
    23. Improper Use of the College Network/Technology - Students are prohibited from engaging in any activities prohibited under Policy 7.2 - Internet and Network Acceptable Use.
    24. Violation of Policies and Procedures - Students are expected to be familiar with the College’s policies and procedures. Students may be disciplined for failure to follow the College’s policies and procedures.
    25. Hazing - An act which endangers the mental or physical health of a student or which destroys or removes public or private property for the purpose of initiation, admission into, affiliation with or as a condition for continued membership in a group or organization.
    26. Smoking and/or using other forms of tobacco products, including electronic cigarettes or other vaping device anywhere on College premises or in College vehicles.

Adopted: April, 2020

DISCIPLINE AND APPEAL FOR ACADEMIC VIOLATIONS PROCEDURE 5.3.2.1

  1. OVERVIEW

The Instructor is responsible for implementing student discipline procedures for academic dishonesty. The College is committed to providing an excellent educational experience for all students. Academic integrity is an essential component to this level of education. The academic penalty for academic-related violations should be clearly stated by the instructor in each course syllabus and reviewed at the beginning of the first class meeting.

These procedures only apply to academic-related violations, outlined herein and defined in Policy 5.3.2 - Student Code of Conduct. For non-academic violations, see Procedure 5.3.2.2.

  1. SANCTIONS FOR VIOLATIONS

The following sanctions may be imposed for academic violations:

  1. Re-complete the assignment;
  2. Additional course work;
  3. Loss of credit for the assignment; or
  4. Loss of credit for the class.
  5. Temporary removal from the classroom. More serious violations will be referred to and be addressed by the Student Code of Conduct Officer.
  1. INSTRUCTOR’S INVESTIGATION AND DETERMINATION
  1. INSTRUCTOR’S INVESTIGATION

An instructor suspecting an incident of an academic-related violation shall follow these steps to address the concern:

  1. The instructor suspecting the alleged violation shall first present concerns to the student and provide an opportunity for the student to explain or refute the concerns.
  2. The student will be allowed to comment on the evidence or to present evidence to clarify the issue in question.
  3. Based on the evidence presented and the student’s comments, the instructor shall determine whether or not an academic-violation has occurred. This determination will result in one of the following findings:
    1. An academic-related violation did not take place and the issue is resolved.
    2. An act of academic dishonesty did occur in the instructor’s opinion.
  1. INSTRUCTOR’S DETERMINATION

The instructor will communicate his/her findings via email to the student’s official College email address within five (5) business days of the initial meeting with the student. If an email address is not available, the instructor shall send his/her written findings to the student’s mailing address on record with the College. The findings must contain, with specificity, the evidence supporting the instructor’s determination. The instructor shall also inform the student of the imposed academic sanctions. The sanction will remain in place unless modified or overturned on appeal.

  1. APPEAL PROCEDURES
  1. A student who disagrees with the instructor’s decision may appeal to the instructor’s immediate supervisor.  This appeal must be submitted in writing within three (3) business days of receipt of the instructor’s decision and describe, with specificity, why the student believes the instructor’s findings to be in error.
  2. The academic supervisor will conduct an “on the record review” examining the instructor’s written findings and student’s written appeal. The academic supervisor may require the student, the instructor and any other necessary party to provide additional documents as needed, including written statements, or provide written clarification to submitted documents.
  3. After considering the evidence presented, the academic supervisor, in consultation with the Vice President, Academic Affairs will affirm, modify or overturn the instructor’s decision.
  4. The academic supervisor will inform the student via the student’s official College email address of the decision within ten (10) business days of the receipt of the student’s appeal. If an email address is not available, the instructor shall send his/her written findings to the student’s mailing address on record with the College.
  5. The academic supervisor and Vice President’s decision is final and reported to the Student Code of Conduct Officer.

Adopted: April, 2020

DISCIPLINE AND APPEAL FOR NON-ACADEMIC VIOLATIONS PROCEDURE 5.3.2.2

  1. OVERVIEW

The Student Code of Conduct Officer (“Conduct Officer”) is responsible for implementing these Procedures.

These Procedures apply to non-academic violations defined in Policy 5.3.2 - Student Code of Conduct. For academic-related violations, see Procedure 5.3.2.1 - Discipline and Appeal for Academic Violations. For issues regarding sexual harassment and sexual violence, see Procedure 5.3.4.1 - Sexual Harassment and Sexual Violence and for issues related to other forms of unlawful discrimination, see Procedure 5.3.4.2 - Unlawful Discrimination.

  1. SANCTIONS FOR VIOLATIONS

The following sanctions may be imposed for non-academic violations:

  1. Verbal Warning. Oral notice that continuation of specified conduct may be cause for more severe disciplinary action.
  2. Reprimand. Written communication which gives official notice to the student that any further disciplinary offense will carry heavier penalties because of this prior infraction.
  3. Disciplinary Probation. Disciplinary probation results in loss of good standing and becomes a matter of record. While on disciplinary probation, the student will not be eligible for initiation into any local or national organization and shall not receive any College award or other honorary recognition. The student may not occupy a position of leadership or responsibility with any College or student organization, publication or activity. This sanction prohibits the student from officially representing the College or participating in any extracurricular activities including intramural competitions. Disciplinary probation will be in effect for not less than two (2) semesters including the current semester. Any further disciplinary offenses while under disciplinary probation will result in the student’s immediate suspension.
  4. Restitution. Restitution is paying for damaging, misusing, destroying or losing property belonging to the College, College employees or students. Restitution may take the form of financial payment or appropriate service to repair or otherwise compensate for such damages.
  5. Withholding Academic Records and/or the Right to Register. Withholding transcripts, diplomas or the right to register or participate in graduation ceremonies is imposed when a student’s financial obligations are not met or the student has a disciplinary case pending final disposition.
  6. Temporary Suspension. Temporary suspension is the exclusion from all College property and all College activities pending the resolution of a disciplinary proceeding.
  7. Disciplinary Suspension. Discipline suspension is the exclusion from all College property and all College activities for a specified period of time. This sanction is reserved for those offenses warranting discipline more severe than disciplinary probation. A student under disciplinary suspension must receive specific written permission from the Vice President before returning to campus. Disciplinary suspension appears on the student’s academic transcript.
  8. Expulsion. Expulsion is dismissing from the College. The student may be readmitted to the College only with the approval of the President. Expulsion appears on the student’s academic transcript.
  9. Group Probation. Group probation is given to a College club or other organized student group for a specified period of time. If group violations are repeated during the term of probation, the charter may be revoked or activities restricted.
  10. Group Restriction. Group restriction is removing College recognition during the semester which the offense occurred, or for a longer period (usually not more than one other semester). While under restriction, the group may not seek to add members, hold or sponsor events in the College community or engage in other activities as specified.
  11. Group Charter Revocation. Revocation is the removal of College recognition for a group, club, society or other organization for a minimum of two (2) years. Re-charter after that time must be approved by the President.

In addition to the above stated sanctions, the College may require counseling. The student may be required to attend one or more counseling sessions with a licensed professional counselor. The student may be required to complete counseling before returning to the College after a period of suspension or expulsion. The student must provide written documentation from the licensed professional that the requirement has been met. Additionally, if required by the Conduct Officer, the student must also provide a statement from the licensed professional that the student is able to return to class based on his/her professional judgment. The student may be referred to the College’s licensed professional counselor at no charge or elect to use his/her own licensed professional counselor and bear the cost.

 

  1. IMMEDIATE REMOVAL FROM CAMPUS

If an act of misconduct threatens the health, safety or well-being of any member of the academic community and/or seriously disrupts the function and good order of the College, an instructor/staff member will immediately notify any College Vice President who will immediately meet with the student and direct the student to cease and desist such conduct and advise the student that failing to cease and desist will result in an immediate removal from campus. If the student(s) fails to cease and desist, or if the behavior is such that the student(s) needs to immediately be removed from campus, the College Vice President may then immediately have the student(s) removed from campus.

The College Vice President invoking the removal shall notify the Conduct Officer in writing of the student involved and the nature of the infraction as soon as possible but no more than one (1) working day following the incident. Upon receipt of the College Vice President written notice, the Conduct Officer shall meet with the student as soon as possible to allow the student to present his/her side. If, in the Conduct Officer’s opinion, the student behavior threatens the health, safety and well-being of the College community, the Conduct Officer shall place the student on temporary suspension pending the outcome of the disciplinary matter. Temporary suspension may be imposed only: (a) to ensure the safety and well-being of members of the College; (b) to ensure the student’s own physical or emotional safety and well-being; or (c) if the student poses a direct threat of disruption or interference with the normal operations of the College.

  1. DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURES

In order to provide an orderly system for handling student disciplinary cases in accordance with due process and justice, the following procedures will be followed:

  1. Behavior Incident Report

Any College employee or student may file written charges with the Conduct Officer against any student or student organization for alleged violations of the Student Code of Conduct. The individual(s) making the charge must complete and submit a Behavior Incident Report within five (5) business days of the incident given rise to the alleged violation.

  1. Investigation and Determination

The Conduct Officer shall conduct an investigation into the charges and allegations. Within ten (10) business days after receipt of the incident report, the Conduct Officer shall complete his/her investigation of the charges and shall meet with the student (or student representative(s) on behalf of a student organization), present the results of the investigation and provide the student (or student representative(s)) with an opportunity to present his/her side. After discussing the alleged violation with the student, the Conduct Officer may act as follows:

  1. Drop the charges;
  2. Impose a sanction; or
  3. Refer the student(s) to a College office or community agency for services.

All disciplinary actions should be progressive in nature and should take into account the totality of the situation; however, depending on the severity of the infraction, even first time offenses could result in suspension or expulsion.

  1. Notification

The Conduct Officer shall provide the student with his/her written decision and instructions governing the appeal process. Such notice shall be given in person or sent to the student’s College email address or mailing address of record.

 

  1. DISCIPLINARY APPEAL PROCEDURE
    1. Appeal to the Disciplinary Review Committee

A student who disagrees with the Conduct Officer’s decision may request an appeal before the Disciplinary Review Committee (“Committee”). This request must be submitted in writing to the Conduct Officer within three (3) working days after receipt of the Conduct Officer’s decision. The Conduct Officer shall refer the matter to the Committee together with a report of the nature of the alleged misconduct, the name of the complainant, the name of the student(s) against whom the charge has been filed, and the relevant facts revealed by the Conduct Officer’s investigation. The Conduct Officer’s decision is not tolled pending an appeal.

  1. Committee Composition

Membership of the Disciplinary Review Committee shall be composed of the following:

  1. Three faculty/staff members appointed by the President.
  2. Three student members appointed by the Student Government Association and approved by the President.
  3. One administrator appointed by the President to serve as Committee Chairperson who will vote only in case of a tie.

At least two faculty/staff members and two students plus the Chairperson must be present in order for the Committee to conduct business.

Committee members will serve one (1) year from the beginning of fall semester through summer semester with replacements appointed by the President or SGA if necessary.

  1. Committee Hearing Procedures
    1. Pre-Hearing Procedural Responsibilities of the Conduct Officer- The Committee must meet within ten (10) working days of receipt of the student’s request for a hearing. At least five (5) working days prior to the date set for the hearing, the Conduct Officer shall send notification to the student(s) with the following information:
      1. A restatement of the charge or charges.
      2. The time and place of the hearing.
      3. A statement of the students’ basic procedural rights.
      4. A list of witnesses that the Conduct Officer or designee plans to present.
      5. The names of the Committee members.

At least two (2) days prior to the hearing, the student(s) will provide the Conduct Officer with a witness list.

  1. ​The following due process rights shall apply to the Committee hearing:
    1. The right to produce witnesses on one’s behalf.
    2. The right to request, in writing, the President to disqualify any member of the Committee for prejudice or bias. (The request must contain reasons). A request for disqualification, if made, must be submitted at least three (3) working days prior to the hearing. If such disqualification occurs, the appropriate nominating body shall appoint a replacement to be approved the President.
    3. The right to present evidence.
    4. The right to know the identity of the person(s) bringing the charge(s).
    5. The right to hear witnesses on behalf of the person(s) bringing the charge(s).
    6. The right to testify or to refuse to testify without such refusal being detrimental to the student.
  1. The following hearing procedures shall apply:
    1. Hearings before the Committee shall be confidential and shall be closed to all persons except the following:
    • The student(s)
    • Committee Members
    • Conduct Officer, or designee
    1. Witnesses shall only be present in the hearing room when giving their testimony.
    2. The Conduct Officer, or designee, shall present evidence and witnesses to support his/her decision. Committee members may ask questions to the witnesses.
    3. The student(s) will then have an opportunity to present evidence and witnesses. Committee members may ask questions to the witnesses.
    4. Each side will have an opportunity to make a short, closing argument. The hearing will be audio recorded. Recordings will become the College’s property and access to the recordings will be determined by the Committee Chairperson. All recordings will be filed in the office of the Conduct Officer. The Chairperson shall establish the record at the close of evidence.
    5. Upon completion of a hearing, the Committee shall meet in closed session to affirm, reverse or modify the Conduct Officer’s decision.
    6. Committee decisions shall be made by majority vote.
    7. Within two (2) working days after the hearing, the Chair shall notify the student(s) and Conduct Officer, in writing, with the Committee’s decision.
    8. The decision of the Committee is final.
  1. Student Voluntary Withdrawal

If a student is accused of violating the Student Code of Conduct and voluntarily withdraws prior to the conclusion of the disciplinary matter , disciplinary proceedings will continue, sanctions imposed will be implemented and the student will not be allowed to re-enroll at the College. For students who withdrew prior to a determination regarding alleged misconduct that threatened the health, safety or well-being of any member of the academic community and/or seriously disrupted the function and good order of the College, in addition to other reasonable re-entry restrictions, the student must provide proof from a psychiatrist or licensed psychologist, at the student’s expense, that the student no longer poses a direct threat.

Adopted: April, 2020

DISCRIMINATION AND HARASSMENT POLICY 5.3.3

The College is fully committed to providing a learning and working environment that is free from prohibited discrimination. The College does not practice or condone discrimination based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity or expression, pregnancy, disability, genetic information, age, political affiliation or veterans’ status in the administration or in any of its education programs and activities and employment practices.

For issues related to sexual harassment, assault and violence, see Procedures 3.3.7.1/5.3.3.1 - Sexual Harassment Procedure.

For issues related to all other types of unlawful discrimination and harassment, see Procedures 3.3.7.2/5.3.3.2 - Unlawful Discrimination and Harassment Procedure.

Updated : June, 2020

Adopted: July, 2020

Legal Reference: Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990; Section 504 of the Rehabilitations Act of 1973; The Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967; Equal Pay Act of 1963; Title II of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008; Title IX of the Higher Education Amendments of 1972; Lily Ledbetter Act; NC Equal Employment Practices Act; NC Retaliatory Employment Discrimination Act; Jeanne Clery Disclosure Act of Campus Security Policy and Campus Statistic Act of 1990; Campus Sexual Assault Victim’s Bill of Rights of 1992; Violence Against Women Act of 1994; Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act of 2013.

 

SEXUAL HARASSMENT AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE PROCEDURE 5.3.3.1

The College strives to make its campuses inclusive and safe and welcoming learning environment for all members of the College community. Pursuant to multiple federal and state laws and administrative regulations and pursuant to College policy, the College prohibits discrimination in its education programs and activities based on sex.

Title IX is a comprehensive federal law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in any federally funded education program or activity.  Under Title IX, discrimination on the basis of sex includes quid pro quo harassment; sexual harassment; and sexual assault, stalking, dating or domestic violence (collectively referred to as “sexual harassment”).  The College’s Title IX Coordinator has oversight responsibility for handling sexual harassment complaints and for identifying and addressing any patterns and/or systemic problems involving sexual discrimination or harassment.

All allegations involving sexual harassment should be directed to the College’s Title IX Coordinator and addressed under these procedures.  For other complaints of discrimination and harassment not related to sexual harassment, refer to Unlawful Discrimination and Harassment Procedure 3.3.7.2/5.3.3.2

 

  1. DEFINITIONS

The following definitions shall apply to this procedure.  The definitions are not intended to operate as speech codes, promote content and viewpoint discrimination or suppress minority viewpoints in the academic setting. Indeed, just because a student’s speech or expression is deemed offensive by others does not mean it constitutes discrimination or harassment.

In applying these definitions, College administrators shall view the speech or expression in its context and totality and shall apply the following standard: the alleged victim subjectively views the conduct as discrimination or harassment and that the conduct is objectively severe or pervasive enough that a reasonable person would agree that the conduct is discriminatory or harassing.

  1. Actual Knowledge - notice of sexual harassment or allegations of sexual harassment by the Title IX Coordinator or any College official who has authority to institute corrective measures on behalf of the College.  Actual knowledge is not met when the only College official with actual knowledge is a Respondent.
  2. Advisor - a person chosen by one of the parties (complainant or respondent) to assist them during the investigation and potential hearing.  The advisor may be, but is not required to be, an attorney.  It could be a friend, family member, faculty member, etc.

  3. Complainant - an individual who is alleged to be the victim of conduct that could constitute sexual harassment.

  4. Consent - explicit approval to engage in sexual activity demonstrated by clear actions or words. This decision must be made freely and actively by all participants. Non-verbal communication, silence, passivity or lack of active resistance does not imply consent. In addition, previous participation in sexual activity does not indicate current consent to participate and consent to one form of sexual activity does not imply consent to other forms of sexual activity. Consent has not been obtained in situations where the individual: i) is forced, pressured, manipulated or has reasonable fear that they will be injured if they do not submit to the act; ii) is incapable of giving consent or is prevented from resisting due to physical or mental incapacity (including being under the influence of drugs or alcohol); or iii) has a mental or physical disability which inhibits his/her ability to give consent to sexual activity.
  5. Dating Violence - crimes of violence against a person with whom the person has or had a social relationship or a romantic or intimate relationship.
  6. Domestic Violence - crimes of violence against a current or former spouse or intimate partner; a person with whom the individual shares a child in common; a person with whom the individual cohabitates or has cohabitated as a spouse or intimate partner; a person similarly situated to the individual as a spouse under local domestic laws; or any other person who is protected under local domestic laws of the jurisdiction.
  7. Education Program or Activity - for purposes of these Procedures, this means any locations, events, or circumstances over which the College exercised substantial control over both the Respondent(s) and the context in which the alleged sexual harassment occurs.  It also means any building owned or controlled by a student organization that is officially recognized by the College.

  8. Formal Complaint - a document filed by a Complainant or signed by the Title IX Coordinator alleging sexual harassment against a Respondent and requesting the College investigate the allegation(s).  A Formal Complaint initiates a formal grievance process in which parties are entitled to due process protections.

  9. Informal Resolution - a resolution reached regarding an allegation of sexual harassment without the filing of a Formal Complaint.  Informal Resolution may include mediation, facilitated dialogue, conflict coaching, restorative justice, or other models of alternative dispute resolution.  Informal Resolution cannot be used for a student’s allegation of sexual harassment against a College employee.

  10. Respondent - an individual who has been reported to be the perpetrator of conduct that could constitute sexual harassment.

  11. Retaliation - to intimidate, threaten, coerce, or discriminate against any individual for the purpose of interfering with any right or privilege secured by Title IX or because the individual has made a report or complaint, testified, assisted, participated, or refused to participate in any manner in an investigation, proceeding, or hearing under these Procedures.

  12. Sexual Assault - an offense that meets the definition of rape, fondling, incest, or statutory rape as used in the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting system.

  13. Sexual Harassment - quid pro quo harassment; unwelcome conduct that a reasonable person would find so severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive that it effectively denies a person equal access to the College’s education program or activity, including conduct based on sex stereotyping; or any instance of sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, or stalking.

Quid pro quo harassment is a person having power or authority over another and conditioning an educational or employment benefit or service or access to receiving the educational or employment benefit or service upon a person’s participation in unwelcome sexual conduct.

  1. Stalking - engaging in a course of conduct directed to a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for his/her safety or the safety of others or suffer substantial emotional distress.
  2. Standard of Evidence - the College uses preponderance of the evidence as the standard for proof of whether a violation of this policy has occurred. In the student due process hearing and employee grievance process, legal terms like “guilt, “innocence” and “burden of proof” are not applicable. Student and employee due process hearings are conducted to take into account the totality of all evidence available from all relevant sources. The College will find the Respondent either “responsible” or “not responsible” for violating these Procedures.
  3. Supportive Measures - individualized services reasonably available that are non-punitive, non-disciplinary, and not unreasonably burdensome to the other party that are designed to ensure equal educational access, protect safety, or deter sexual harassment.  Examples of support measures are counseling, extensions of deadlines or other course-related adjustments, modifications of work or class schedules, campus escort services, mutual restrictions on contact between the parties, leaves of absences, increased security and monitoring of certain areas of the College, and other similar measures.
  4. Title IX Coordinator - for purposes of these Procedures, the Title IX Coordinator is: 

    Candice Epps Jackson
    Brooks Student Center 202
    (336) 249-8186 ext. 4 516
    titleix@davidsonccc.edu 
    Candice_Jackson@Davidsonccc.edu

 

  1. SCOPE AND APPLICABILITY
    1. These Procedures apply to the conduct of and protect:
      1. College students and applicants for admission into the College
      2. College employees and applicants for employment
      3. College student organizations
      4. Third parties participating in a College education program or activity
    2. These Procedures apply to conduct that occurs in a College Education Program or Activity located within the United States and of which the College has actual knowledge.

 

  1. REPORTING
    1. Reporting to Local Law Enforcement.

Individuals may report Sexual Misconduct directly to local law enforcement agencies by dialing 911. Individuals who make a criminal allegation may also choose to pursue College disciplinary action simultaneously. A criminal investigation into the matter does not release the College from its obligation to conduct its own investigation (nor is a criminal investigation determinative of whether Sexual Misconduct has occurred). However, the College’s investigation may be delayed temporarily while the criminal investigators are gathering evidence. In the event of such a delay, the College must make available supportive measures when necessary to protect the alleged Complainant and/or the College community.

Individuals may choose not to report alleged sexual harassment to law enforcement authorities. The College respects and supports individuals’ decisions regarding reporting; nevertheless, the College may notify appropriate law enforcement authorities if legally required or warranted by the nature of the allegations.

  1. Reporting to College Officials

The College’s Title IX Coordinator oversees compliance with these Procedures and Title IX regulations.  Questions about these Procedures should be directed to the Title IX Coordinator.  Anyone wishing to make a report relating to sexual harassment may do so by reporting the concern to the College’s Title IX Coordinator in person, by mail, by telephone, by email, or by any other means that results in the Title IX Coordinator receiving the person’s verbal or written report of alleged sexual harassment.

 

  1. GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES

    1. Scope

      1. Use of these grievance procedures applies to reports alleging sexual harassment carried out by employees, students, or third parties.

      2. All reports of sexual harassment are taken seriously.  At the same time, those accused of sexual harassment are presumed “not responsible” throughout this grievance procedure.

    2. Initial College Response and Assessment

      1. After receiving a report of sexual harassment, the Title IX Coordinator takes immediate and appropriate steps to:

        1. Communicate with the individual who reported the alleged conduct;

        2. Implement supportive measures to eliminate and prevent the recurrence of sex harassment, deter retaliation, remedy the effects of sex harassment, and provide due process rights during a College investigation;

        3. Provide the individual with a copy of  the Policy and Procedure; and

        4. Determine whether the alleged conduct, as described by the reporting party, falls within the scope of this policy and if so, initiate the investigation and resolution procedures.

        5. The Title IX Coordinator may delegate the authority to take some or all of these steps to a Deputy Title IX Coordinator.

      2. The Title IX Coordinator must administratively close a report or complaint of sexual harassment if after an initial assessment:

        1. The allegations as stated do not constitute a violation of this Policy and Procedure, even if proven; or

        2. The alleged sexual harassment did not occur in the College’s Education Program or Activity or did not occur in the United States.

        3. The Title IX Coordinator will notify the parties if a report or complaint of sexual harassment is closed under this section, including the reason(s) for closure, and direct the parties to the appropriate College office or department to resolve the report or complaint.  All parties may appeal the Title IX Coordinator’s dismissal of a Formal Complaint under this section by using the appeal procedures in Section VI.

      3. The Title IX Coordinator may administratively close a report or complaint of sexual harassment if:

        1. The Complainant, at any time, requests withdrawal of the report or complaint;

        2. The Respondent is no longer enrolled or employed by the College; or

        3. The College is prevented from gathering evidence sufficient to reach a determination of responsibility.

        4. The Title IX Coordinator will notify the parties if a report or complaint of sexual harassment is closed under this section, including the reason(s) for closure, and direct the parties to the appropriate College office or department to resolve the report or complaint.  All parties may appeal the Title IX Coordinator’s dismissal of a Formal Complaint under this section by using the appeal procedures in Section VI.

      4. Regardless of when the alleged sexual harassment is reported, a Complainant must be participating in or attempting to participate in the College’s education program or activity for a Formal Complaint to be filed.

    3. ​Informal Process

      1. Any party may request the College facilitate an informal resolution to a sexual harassment complaint at any time after the filing of a Formal Complaint.  The Title IX Coordinator may offer the parties the opportunity for informal resolution, too.

        1. Upon a request for informal resolution, the Title IX Coordinator determines whether informal resolution is appropriate based on the facts and circumstances of the case.  The Title IX Coordinator ensures that any proposed informal resolution is consistent with the College’s obligations to prevent and redress sexual harassment.

        2. A student’s allegations of sexual harassment against a College employee are not eligible for informal resolution.

        3. The Title IX Coordinator provides the parties with written notice of proceeding with an informal resolution, including the allegations of sexual harassment, the requirements of the informal resolution process, and potential outcomes resulting from participating in the informal resolution process.

        4. The Title IX Coordinator also designates an independent, neutral person to facilitate the informal resolution.

      2. Informal resolution is voluntary.

        1. The Complainant and Respondent must provide written consent for informal resolution to take place.

        2. Any party has a right to end the informal resolution process at any time prior to agreeing to a resolution and begin or continue the formal investigation and grievance process.

      3. Informal resolution concludes the matter only when all parties have signed a written agreement that confirms resolution of the allegations.

        1. The resolution agreement must include a waiver of the parties’ right to have a formal hearing on the allegations that have been informally resolved.

        2. Parties are prohibited from revoking or appealing a resolution agreement. Should the Respondent violate the terms of an informal resolution agreement, such violation will subject the Respondent to an investigation and the formal grievance process contained in this procedure.

      4. If a resolution agreement is not reached, the College will continue with a formal investigation.

    4. Formal Process

      1. The goal of a formal investigation is to reach a determination as to whether a Respondent has violated one or more College policies prohibiting sexual harassment and if so, remedy the effects of a violation.

        1. The Title IX Coordinator may include possible violations of other College policies that contributed to, arose from, or are otherwise related to alleged violations of this Policy and Procedure in the scope of an investigation.

        2. The Title IX Coordinator gives written notice to the Complainant and Respondent of the investigation, providing sufficient details to allow the parties to respond and prepare for initial interviews, including the identity of the parties involved (if known), the conduct alleged to be sexual harassment, the date and location of alleged incidents (if known), a statement that the Respondent is presumed not responsible and a determination of responsibility is made at the conclusion of the process, information regarding the parties’ right to an advisor and the right to review evidence, and notice that the College prohibits knowingly making false statements or submitting false information during the grievance process.

        3. The Title IX Coordinator designates an investigator to investigate the allegations of sexual harassment.

      2. Parties to an investigation can expect a prompt, thorough, and equitable investigation of complaints, including the opportunity for parties to ask questions, present witnesses and provide information regarding the allegations.

      3. Parties and witnesses should cooperate in the investigation process to the extent required by law and this policy.

      4. The standard of proof used in investigations is preponderance of the evidence.  It is the College’s responsibility to establish the standard of proof and gather evidence during investigations.

      5. The College aims to complete all investigations to a resolution within thirty (30) business days from the date the Title IX Coordinator determines an investigation will commence.

        1. Extensions of timeframe for good cause are allowed, so long as written notice and the reason for the delay is provided to the parties.  Good cause includes:

          1. The complexity and/or number of the allegations;

          2. The severity and extent of the alleged misconduct;

          3. The number of parties, witnesses, and other types of evidence involved;

          4. The availability of the parties, witnesses, and evidence;

          5. A request by a party to delay an investigation;

          6. The effect of a concurrent criminal investigation or proceeding;

          7. Intervening holidays, College breaks, or other closures;

          8. Good faith efforts to reach a resolution; or

          9. Other unforeseen circumstances.

        2. Investigations typically include interviews with the Complainant, the Respondent, and any witnesses, and the objective evaluation of any physical, documentary, or other evidence as appropriate and available.  The College will give the Complainant and the Respondent written notice of any interview, meeting, or hearing at which a party is invited or expected to participate.

        3. The Title IX Coordinator will inform the Complainant and Respondent at regular intervals of the status of its investigation.

        4. The College may suspend or place on administrative leave a student or employee, pending the completion of an investigation and resolution, when the College performs an individualized safety and risk analysis and determines the person poses an immediate threat to the physical health or safety of any member(s) of the College community.

          1. The Title IX Coordinator may recommend to the appropriate College official to implement or stay an interim suspension of a student or employee and the conditions and duration of such suspension or leave.

          2. In all cases in which an interim suspension or administrative leave is imposed, the student or employee shall be given notice and an opportunity to challenge the removal decision immediately following the removal.

          3. Violation of an interim suspension under this Procedure is grounds for expulsion or termination.

      6. Interviews conducted as part of an investigation under this Procedure may be recorded by the College.  Recordings not authorized by the College are prohibited.

      7. The Complainant and Respondent have the right to be accompanied by an advisor of their choosing during all stages of an investigation.

        1. A party may elect to change advisors during the process.

        2. All advisors are subject to the same rules:

          1. During the investigation, the advisor’s role is limited to providing advice, guidance, and support to the Complainant or Respondent.  An advisor is not permitted to act as a participant or advocate during the investigative process.

          2. Advisors are expected to maintain the privacy of the records shared with them.

          3. Advisors are expected to refrain from interfering with investigations.

          4. Any advisor who oversteps their role or interferes during an investigation process will be warned once.  If the advisor continues to disrupt or otherwise fails to respect the limits of the advisor role, the advisor will be asked to leave.  The Title IX Coordinator determines whether the advisor may return or should be replaced by a different advisor.

      8. Prior to finalizing a report, the investigator provides all parties an equal opportunity to review any evidence obtained as part of the investigation that is directly related to the allegations raised in the Formal Complaint, including evidence upon which the College does not intend to rely.

        1. The Complainant and Respondent may submit a written response to the evidence within ten days after receipt of the evidence.

          1. Responses must be submitted to the investigator via email, mail, or hand delivery by 5:00 p.m. eastern standard time on the date responses are due.

          2. Responses may not exceed 10 double-spaced pages on 8.5x11 paper with one-inch margins and 12-point font.

        2. The investigator considers any responses received from the parties and conducts any further investigation necessary or appropriate.

      9. Following an investigation and at least 10 days prior to a grievance hearing, the investigator submits an investigative report to the parties that fairly summarizes relevant evidence.  The report includes a summary of the allegations; a summary of the response; a summary of the investigative steps taken to verify the allegations and response; and a summary of the evidence relevant to a determination of responsibility.

  2. ​​GRIEVANCE HEARINGS

     At least 10 days after the issuance of an investigation report, the College must hold a live hearing in front of a panel of decision-makers to determine responsibility of a Respondent.  The panel of decision-makers will be comprised of DCCC Vice Presidents. A “live hearing” means either in person or virtually.  The following hearing rules apply:

    1. All parties must be able to see and hear the questioning of parties and witnesses.

    2. Any party may request a virtual hearing.  If requested, the College will provide a virtual hearing.

    3. All parties have an equal opportunity to present witnesses, including fact and expert witnesses.

    4. The parties’ advisors are permitted to cross-examine the parties and any witnesses.

      1. The parties are prohibited from directly conducting cross-examination.  Cross-examination must be conducted by a party’s advisor.

      2. The decision-makers determine whether questions asked during cross-examination are relevant to the determination of responsibility.  If the decision-makers disallow a question, they will explain the basis for their decision at the hearing.  Parties and advisors may not challenge a decision-maker’s relevancy determinations during the hearing.

      3. Evidence or questions that inquire about the Complainant’s sexual predisposition or prior sexual history are prohibited (i.e. rape-shield protections) unless such questions and evidence are offered to prove that someone other than the Respondent committed the conduct alleged by the Complainant, or if the questions and evidence concern specific incidents of the Complainant’s prior sexual behavior with respect to the Respondent and are offered to prove consent.

      4. The decision-makers may not consider statements of individuals who do not submit to cross-examination in reaching a determination of responsibility

      5. Records with a legally recognized privilege, such as medical treatment records, may not be used unless the individual or entity who holds the privilege waives the privilege.  Any waiver must be written and made in advance of a hearing.

      6. If a party does not have an advisor, the College will provide an advisor at no cost to the party.  The advisor may, or may not, be an attorney.

      7. Other standard Rules of Evidence do not apply in grievance hearings under these Procedures.

    5. The College will provide either an audio recording, audiovisual recording, or transcript of the hearing to all parties.

    6. The panel of decision-makers evaluate all relevant evidence and reaches a determination regarding responsibility. The decision-makers issue their final written determination to all parties within ten (10) days of the hearing.  The final written determination includes a summary of the allegations; a description of the procedural steps taken by the College to investigate and reach a determination of responsibility; findings of fact supporting the determination; conclusions regarding the application of College policies to the facts; a statement of and rationale for the result as to each allegation, including a determination of responsibility; any disciplinary sanctions the College recommends or imposes; whether remedies designed to restore or preserve equal access to an education program or activity will be provided to the Complainant; and the College’s appeal procedures.

    7. The following sanctions may be imposed for those who have violated these Procedures:

      1. Students

        1. Verbal or Written Warning

        2. Probation

        3. Administrative withdrawal from a course without refund

        4. Required Counseling

        5. No Contact Directive

        6. Suspension

        7. Recommendation of Expulsion

        8. Other consequences deemed appropriate

      2. Employees

        1. Verbal or Written Warning

        2. Performance Improvement Plan

        3. Required Counseling

        4. Required Training or Education

        5. Recommendation of Demotion

        6. Recommendation to Suspend with or without Pay

        7. Recommendation of Dismissal

        8. Other consequences deemed appropriate to the specific violation

If the decision-makers are required to make a recommendation for student expulsion or employee suspension, demotion or dismissal, such recommendation will be made to the appropriate College official after the time for appeal has expired.  If the decision-makers recommend the Respondent be expelled, suspended, demoted, or dismissed, during the time in which either party has to appeal, the Respondent shall remain on suspension unless otherwise determined by the decision-makers.

 

  1. APPEALS

After the decision-makers submits their determination of responsibility to the Complainant and Respondent, all parties are given an equal opportunity to appeal the determination.  Appeals may be based only on these grounds:

  1. Procedural irregularity that affected the outcome;
  2. New evidence that was not reasonably available at the time of the hearing that could affect the outcome; and/or
  3. The Title IX Coordinator, investigator, or decision-makers had a bias or conflict of interest that affected the outcome.

Parties must submit any appeal to the President of the College by 5:00 p.m. eastern standard time via email or mail, within ten (10) days of receiving the panel of decision-maker’s written determination of responsibility.  Appeals may not exceed ten (10) double-spaced pages on 8.5x11 paper with one-inch margins and 12-point font.

The College notifies all parties when an appeal is filed and provides all parties a copy of the appeal and a chance to submit a written statement supporting or challenging the outcome.  Parties must submit written statements supporting or challenging the outcome to the President of the College by 5:00 p.m. eastern standard time via email or mail, within two (2) days of receiving a copy of an appeal.

The President shall conduct a review of the record, including the appeal(s) received, any written statements supporting or challenging the outcome, the investigation report, the panel of decision-maker’s written determination of responsibility, and any accompanying evidence prior to issuing a written decision to the Complainant and Respondent that describes the result of the appeal and the rationale for the result.

The President’s written decision is final.

 

  1. PROTECTION AGAINST RETALIATION

The College will not in any way retaliate against an individual for the purpose of interfering with any right or privilege secured by Title IX or because the individual has made a report or complaint, testified, assisted, participated, or refused to participate in any manner in an investigation, proceeding, or hearing under these Procedures.

Retaliation is a violation of College policy regardless of whether the underlying allegations are ultimately found to have merit.  Reports of retaliation are treated separately from reports or complaints of sexual harassment.

 

  1. PROVIDING FALSE INFORMATION

Any individual who knowingly files a false report or complaint, who knowingly provides false information to College officials or who knowingly misleads College officials involved in the investigation or resolution of a complaint may be subject to disciplinary action, including but not limited to expulsion or employment termination.  The College recognizes a determination regarding responsibility alone is not sufficient to conclude a false report or complaint was made.

 

  1. LIMITED IMMUNITY

The College community encourages the reporting of misconduct and crimes.  Sometimes, complainants or witnesses are hesitant to report to College officials or participate in resolution processes because they fear they themselves may be accused of various policy violations.  It is in the best interest of this College that as many complainants as possible choose to report to College officials and that witnesses come forward to share what they know.  To encourage reporting, the College offers sexual harassment complainants and witnesses amnesty from minor policy violations.

 

  1. FERPA (Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act)

A student’s personally identifiable information found in a student’s education records will be shared only with College employees who need to know to assist with the College’s response to sexual harassment.

A student’s personally identifiable information found in a student’s education records will not be disclosed to third parties unaffiliated with the College unless:

  1. The student gives consent;
  2. The College must respond to a lawfully issued subpoena or court order; or
  3. The College is otherwise required by law to disclose.

 

  1. SUSPENDING PROCEDURES

In cases of emergency or serious misconduct, the College reserves the right to suspend this process and may enact appropriate action for the welfare and safety of the College community.

 

  1. STUDENT AND EMPLOYEE EDUCATION AND ANNUAL TRAINING

The Title IX Coordinator, investigators, decision-makers, and those involved in any informal resolution process shall receive annual trainings on topics including:

  1. The definition of sexual harassment for Title IX purposes;
  2. The scope of the College’s education programs and activities under Title IX;
  3. How to conduct an investigation and grievance process including hearings, appeals, and informal resolution processes;
  4. How to serve impartially, including avoiding prejudgment of facts at issue, conflicts of interest, and bias;
  5. Technology to be used at live hearings;
  6. Issues of relevance of questions and evidence, including rape-shield limitations; and
  7. Issues of relevance to create an investigative report that fairly summarizes relevant evidence.

All training materials are posted on the College’s website.

All new students and all employees shall be required to participate in a primary prevention and awareness program that promotes awareness of sexual harassment.  This program will be held annually at the beginning of each fall semester.

At this annual training, students and employees must receive training in the following areas:

  1. Information about safe and positive options for bystander intervention skills;
  2. What “consent” means with reference to sexual activities;
  3. Risk reduction programs so students recognize and can avoid abusive behaviors or potential attacks;
  4. How and to whom to report an incident regarding discrimination, harassment and sex-based violence;
  5. The importance of preserving physical evidence in a sex-based violent crime; and
  6. Options about the involvement of law enforcement and campus authorities, including the alleged victim’s option to: i) notify law enforcement; ii) be assisted by campus authorities in notifying law enforcement; iii) decline to notify law enforcement; and iv) obtain “no-contact” or restraining orders.

Each year, all students and employees will receive an electronic copy of these Procedures sent to their College email address of record.  These Procedures will be maintained online in the College’s website and a hard copy will be kept on file (in English and Spanish) in the Title IX Coordinator’s office.  Other translations will be made available upon request.

 

  1. RECORDKEEPING

The College maintains all records of Title IX proceedings and all materials used to train Title IX personnel for seven years.

 

Updated: June, 2020

Adopted: July, 2020

Legal Reference:  Title IX of the Education Amendments Act of 1972, as amended, 20 U.S.C. 1681 et seq. and its implementing regulations; Office for Civil Rights, Q&A on Campus Sexual Misconduct (September 2017) (opens in new window); Office for Civil Rights, Dear Colleague Letter on Sexual Harassment (Jan. 25, 2006) (opens in new window); Office for Civil Right Office for Civil Rights, Revised Sexual Harassment Guidance (66 Fed. Reg. 5512, Jan. 19, 2001) (opens in new window)

 

UNLAWFUL DISCRIMINATION AND HARASSMENT PROCEDURE 5.3.3.2

The College strives to make its campuses inclusive and a safe and welcoming learning environment for all members of the College community. Pursuant to multiple federal and state laws and administrative regulations and pursuant to College policy, the College prohibits discrimination in its activities, services and programs based on race, religion, color, national origin, sex, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, disability, genetic information, pregnancy, political affiliation or veterans’ status.

  1. DEFINITIONS

The following definitions shall apply to this Procedure and shall be collectively referred to herein as “Unlawful Discrimination”.

The definitions are not intended to operate as speech codes, promote content and viewpoint discrimination or suppress minority viewpoints in the academic setting. Indeed, just because a student’s speech or expression is deemed offensive by others does not mean it constitutes discrimination or harassment.

In applying these definitions, College administrators shall view the speech or expression in its context and totality and shall apply the following standard: the alleged victim subjectively views the conduct as discrimination or harassment and that the conduct is objectively severe or pervasive enough that a reasonable person would agree that the conduct is discriminatory or harassing.

  1. Discrimination: any act or failure to act that unreasonably differentiates treatment of others based solely on their Protected Status and is sufficiently serious, based on the perspective of a reasonable person, to unreasonably interfere with or limit the ability of that individual to participate in, access or benefit from the College’s programs and activities. Discrimination may be intentional or unintentional.
  2. Harassment: a type of discrimination that happens when verbal, physical, electronic or other behavior based on a person’s Protected Status interferes with a person’s participation in the College’s programs and activities and it either creates an environment that a reasonable person would find hostile, intimidated or abusive or where submitting to or rejecting the conduct is used as the basis for decisions that affect the person’s participation in the College’s programs and activities.

Harassment may include but is not limited to: threatening or intimidating conduct directed at another because of the individual’s Protected Status; ethnic slurs, negative stereotypes and hostile acts based on an individual’s Protected Status.

  1. Protected Status: race, color, national origin, religion, pregnancy, disability, genetic information, sexual orientation, age, political affiliation or veterans’ status.
  2. Standard of Evidence - the College uses the preponderance of evidence as the standard for proof of whether a violation occurred. In the student due process hearing and employee grievance process, legal terms like “guilt, “innocence” and “burden of proof” are not applicable. Student and employee due process hearings are conducted to take into account the totality of all evidence available from all relevant sources. The College will find the alleged Perpetrator either “responsible” or “not responsible” for violating these Procedures.
  1. STATEMENTS OF PROHIBITION
    1. Prohibition of Retaliation.

The College strictly prohibits punishing students or employees for asserting their rights to be free from Unlawful Discrimination. Retaliation against any person participating in connection with a complaint of Unlawful Discrimination is strictly prohibited. Reports of retaliation will be addressed through this procedure and/or other applicable College procedures. Retaliation includes, but is not limited to, any form of intimidation, punitive actions from authority figures or peers, reprisal (acts of vengeance) or harassment. Retaliation is a serious violation and should be reported immediately. The College will take appropriate disciplinary action against any employee or student found to have retaliated against another.

  1. Prohibition of Providing False Information.

Any individual who knowingly files a false report or complaint, who knowingly provides false information to College officials, or who intentionally misleads College officials involved in the investigation or resolution of a complaint may be subject to disciplinary action including, but not limited to expulsion or employment termination. The College recognizes that an allegation made in good faith will not be considered false when the evidence does not confirm the allegation(s) of Unlawful Discrimination.

  1. REQUESTING ACCOMMODATIONS
    1. Students.

Students with disabilities wishing to make a request for reasonable accommodations, auxiliary communication aids or services, or materials in alternative accessible formats should contact the College’s Office of Disability Access Services. Information provided by students is voluntary and strict confidentiality is maintained. All requests for accommodations will be considered following the appropriate federal and state laws.

The College will also provide reasonable accommodation of a student’s religious beliefs/practices provided such expression/practice does not create a hostile environment for other students and employees and/or the accommodation does not cause an undue hardship for the College.

  1. Employees.

Employees with disabilities wishing to make a request for reasonable accommodations, auxiliary communication aids or services, or materials in alternative accessible formats should contact the College’s Office of Human Resources. Information provided by employees is voluntary and strict confidentiality is maintained.

The College will also provide reasonable accommodation of an employee’s religious beliefs/practices provided such expression/practice does not create a hostile environment for other employees and students and/or the accommodation does not cause an undue hardship for the College.

  1. REPORTING OPTIONS
    1. Student Complaints.

Any student wishing to make a report relating to Unlawful Discrimination may do so by reporting the concern to the College’s Conduct Officer located in the Brooks Student Center.

For Unlawful Discrimination incidents between students and employees, the Conduct Officer will work in partnership with the Director of Human Resources to investigate and resolve the allegations.

  1. Employee Complaints.

Any employee wishing to make a report related to Unlawful Discrimination may do so by reporting the concern to the College’s Director of Human Resources located in the Brooks Student Center.

  1. INITIAL INVESTIGATION

As these Procedures apply to both students and employees as either the Complainant or the Respondent, the administrator receiving the incident report will determine if the case should be handled by: 1) the Conduct Officer, or designee (student/student); 2) the Director of Human Resources, or designee (employee/employee); or 3) both (student/employee). For incidents involving students and employees, the College will utilize the process for both the student investigation and the employee investigation sections as applicable.

  1. Student Investigation.
    1. Students filing complaints (“Complainants”) are urged to do so in writing as soon as possible but no later than thirty (30) days after disclosure or discovery of the facts giving rise to the complaint. Complaints submitted after the thirty (30) day period will still be investigated; however, Complainants should recognize that delays in reporting may significantly impair the ability of College officials to investigate and respond to such complaints. The Conduct Officer shall fully investigate any complaints and will, as needed and if the complaint also involves an employee, collaborate with the College’s Director of Human Resources. During the course of the investigation, the Conduct Officer may consult with other relevant College administrators and the College Attorney.
    2. During the investigation, and if applicable to the complaint, the Conduct officer shall meet with the Complainant and the Respondent separately and give each party an equal opportunity to provide evidence, including informing the Vice President of any potential witnesses. Both parties will be given access to any information provided by the other in accordance with any federal or state confidentiality laws.
    3. During the investigation process, the Conduct Officer may implement temporary measures in order to facilitate an efficient and thorough investigation process as well as to protect the rights of all parties involved. The temporary actions include, but are not limited to: reassignment of class schedules; temporary suspension from campus (but be allowed to complete coursework); or the directives that include no contact between the involved parties.
    4. A confidential file regarding the complaint shall be maintained by the Conduct Officer. To the extent possible, the College will keep all information relating to the complaint and investigations confidential; however, to maintain compliance with the Clery Act, both parties will be informed of the outcome of any institutional proceedings under these Procedures.
    5. The Conduct Officer shall make every effort to conclude the investigation as soon as possible but no later than sixty (60) calendar days. If the nature of the investigation requires additional time, the Conduct Officer may have an additional ten (10) calendar days to complete the investigation. The Conduct Officer shall notify the parties of this extension.
    6. Complainants will be notified of available counseling services and their options of changing academic situations and other interim protective measures.
  1. Employee Investigations.
    1. Employees filing complaints (“Complainants”) are urged to do so in writing as soon as possible but no later than thirty (30) days after disclosure or discovery of the facts giving rise to the complaint. Complaints submitted after the thirty (30) day period will still be investigated; however, Complainants should recognize that delays in reporting may significantly impair the ability of College officials to investigate and respond to such complaints. The Director of Human Resources shall fully investigate any complaints. During the course of the investigation, the Director of Human Resources may consult with other relevant College administrators and the College Attorney.
    2. During the investigation, and if applicable to the complaint, the Director of Human Resources shall meet with the Complainant and the alleged Perpetrator (“Respondent”) separately and give each party an equal opportunity to provide evidence, including informing the Director of Human Resources of any potential witnesses. Both parties will be given access to any information provided by the other in accordance with any federal or state confidentiality laws.
    3. During the investigation process, the Director of Human Resources may implement temporary measures in order to facilitate an efficient and thorough investigation process as well as to protect the rights of all parties involved. The Director of Human Resources may suspend an employee with pay pending an investigation if such action is in the College’s best interest.
    4. A confidential file regarding the complaint shall be maintained by the Director of Human Resources. To the extent possible, the College will keep all information relating to the complaint and investigations confidential; however, to maintain compliance with the Clery Act, both parties will be informed of the outcome of any institutional proceedings under this Procedures.
    5. The Director of Human Resources shall make every effort to conclude the investigation as soon as possible but no later than sixty (60) calendar days. If the nature of the investigation requires additional time, the Director of Human Resources may have an additional ten (10) calendar days to complete the investigation and shall notify the parties of this extension.
    6. Complainants will be notified of available counseling services and other interim protective measures.
  1. RECOMMENDATION AND APPEAL
    1. Students.
      1. After the investigation is complete, the Conduct Officer will put forward a recommendation of finding, based on the preponderance of, and sanction(s) to both the Complainant and Respondent. If the recommendation is accepted by both parties involved, the recommendation and sanction(s) will become effective. The Conduct Officer will submit to each party a final outcome letter that will include, but not limited to, the following:
        1. Determination if the Respondent is responsible or not responsible for violating these Procedures;
        2. Sanction;
        3. Whether monitoring of academic schedules is needed between the parties to ensure that the individuals involved are not in classes together (the Vice President will assist in this process).
        4. Short-term College counseling services available to each party.
      2. If the Conduct Officer’s recommendations are not accepted by either the Complainant or the Respondent, both may appeal and request a formal hearing. If the Conduct Officer recommends sanctions that s/he cannot impose (i.e., expulsion), the matter shall automatically be set for a hearing. The Vice President will preside over the hearing as the Presiding Officer. The process for the hearing is outlined below:
        1. Prior to the hearing, the Complainant and the Respondent have the right to review all evidence, including written statements by the Respondent, the Complainant, or witnesses. Strict rules of evidence do not apply. The Standard of Evidence shall apply for the hearing.
        2. Written notice including the date, time, and location of the hearing will be sent to all parties.
        3. At the hearing, all pertinent parties have a right to speak and be questioned by the Presiding Officer. Cross-examination between parties is not permitted. The College will provide options for questioning without confrontation. Each phase of the hearing will be heard by both parties in separate rooms by use of a speaker phone.
        4. The Complainant and the Respondent are allowed to be accompanied by an advocate. The advocate may not present on behalf of either party unless otherwise instructed to do so by the Presiding Officer. If the Complainant or the Respondent chooses to have an advocate who is an attorney, notification must be provided to the Presiding Officer at least five (5) College business days prior to the hearing date. In this case, the College Attorney will also be present.
        5. Both parties have a right to a written notice of the hearing outcome.
  1. Employees.
    1. After the investigation is complete, the Director of Human Resources will put forward a recommendation of finding, based on the Standard of Evidence, and sanctions to both the Complainant and Respondent. If the recommendation is accepted by both parties involved, the recommendation and sanctions will become effective. A final outcome letter will be submitted to the Complainant and Respondent that may include, but not limited to, the following:
      1. Determination if the Respondent is responsible, not responsible, or if the decision is deemed inconclusive, or shared responsibility.
      2. Sanction, if appropriate.
      3. Monitoring of academic schedules or workplace schedule if needed.
      4. Short-term counseling services will be offered to each party.
    2. If the Director of Human Resources’ recommendations are not accepted by either the Complainant or the Respondent, both may appeal and request a formal hearing. If the Director of Human Resources recommends sanctions that s/he cannot impose (i.e., termination) the matter will automatically be set for a hearing. The Vice President will preside over the hearing as the Presiding Officer. The process for the hearing is outlined below:
      1. Prior to the hearing, the Complainant and the Respondent have the right to review all evidence, including written statements by the Respondent, the Complainant, or witnesses. Strict rules of evidence do not apply. The preponderance of evidence shall apply for the hearing.
      2. Written notice including the date, time, and location of the hearing will be sent to all parties.
      3. At the hearing, all pertinent parties have a right to speak and be questioned by the Presiding Officer. Cross-examination between parties is not permitted. The College will provide options for questioning without confrontation. Each phase of the hearing will be heard by both parties in separate rooms by use of a speaker phone.
      4. The Complainant and the Respondent are allowed to be accompanied by an advocate. The advocate may not present on behalf of either party unless otherwise instructed to do so by the Presiding Officer. If the Complainant or the Respondent chooses to have an advocate who is an attorney, notification must be provided to the Presiding Officer at least three (3) College business days prior to the hearing date. In this case, the College Attorney will also be present.
      5. Both parties have a right to a written notice of the hearing outcome.
  1. Sanctioning.

The following sanctions may be imposed for those who have violated these procedures.

  1. Students.
    1. Verbal or Written Warning
    2. Probation
    3. Administrative withdrawal from a course without refund
    4. Required Counseling
    5. No Contact Directive
    6. Suspension
    7. Expulsion
    8. Other consequences deemed appropriate
  2. Employees.
    1. Verbal or Written Warning
    2. Performance Improvement Plan
    3. Required Counseling
    4. Required Training or Education
    5. Demotion
    6. Suspend with or without Pay
    7. Termination
    8. Other consequences deemed appropriate to the specific violation

AdoptedApril, 2020

ALCOHOL AND DRUGS ON CAMPUS POLICY 5.3.4

The College is committed to providing each of its students a drug and alcohol-free environment in which to attend classes and study. From a safety perspective, the users of drugs or alcohol may impair the well-being of students, interfere with the College’s educational environment and result in damage to College property.

  1. Prohibition
    1. All students are prohibited from unlawfully possessing, using, being under the influence of, manufacturing, dispensing, selling, or distributing alcohol, illegal or unauthorized controlled substances or impairing substances at any College location.
      1. Controlled Substance means any substance listed in 21 CFR Part 1308 and other federal regulations, as well as those listed in Article V, Chapter 90 of the North Carolina General Statutes. Generally, the term means any drug which has a high potential for abuse and includes, but is not limited to heroin, marijuana, cocaine, PCP, GHB, methamphetamines, and crack. This term also includes any drugs that are illegal under federal, state or local laws and legal drugs that have been obtained illegally or without a prescription by a licensed healthcare provider or are not intended for human consumption.
      2. Alcohol means any beverage containing at least one-half of one percent (0.5%) alcohol by volume, including malt beverages, unfortified wine, fortified wine, spirituous liquor and mixed beverages.
      3. Impairing Substances means any substance taken that may cause impairment, including but not limited to bath salts, inhalants, or synthetic herbs.
      4. College Location means in any College building or on any College premises; in any College-owned vehicle or in any other College-approved vehicle used to transport students to and from College or College activities; and off College property at any College-sponsored or College-approved activity, event or function, such as a field trip or athletic event, where students are under the College’s jurisdiction.
    2. Student use of drugs as prescribed by a licensed physician is not a violation of Policy; however, individuals shall be held strictly accountable for their behavior while under the influence of prescribed drugs.
    3. If an employee reasonably believes a student is under the influence of a controlled substance in violation of this policy, the employee should report the matter to a College administrator.  In addition to any disciplinary sanctions set forth in Section E, the College may refer the matter to law enforcement. Law enforcement officers must adhere to their normal standards when interviewing students or conducting a search.
    4. The College does not differentiate between drug users, drug pushers or sellers. Any student in violation of Section A herein will be subject to disciplinary action up to and including termination or expulsion and referral for prosecution.
    5. A student who violates the terms of this Policy will be subject to disciplinary action in accordance with Policy 5.3.2 - Student Code of Conduct. At his/her discretion, the Student Conduct Officer may require any student who violates the terms of this Policy to satisfactorily participate in a drug abuse rehabilitation program or an alcoholic rehabilitation program sponsored by an approved private or governmental institution as a precondition of continued or re-enrollment at the College.
    6. For purposes of Clery Act Reporting (Policy 5.2.2), each student is required to inform the College, in writing, within five (5) days after he/she is convicted for violation of any federal, state, or local criminal drug statute or alcoholic beverage control statute where such violation occurred while on or at a College location. Failure to do so could result in disciplinary action.
    7. In addition to this Policy, students employed by the College, including students employed under the College’s Work Study Program, shall adhere to the requirements in Policy 3.4.4 - Alcohol and Drugs on Campus.
  2. Drug and Alcohol Abuse Awareness Prevention Program

The College operates a drug abuse awareness prevention program for all students and employees. Counseling, information, and referral services are provided by professionally trained counselors and counselors are available to talk with anyone concerning drug/alcohol use and abuse. Referrals to external agencies may be appropriate in some situations.

Free information concerning drugs and/or alcohol use and abuse is displayed and distributed around campus. The College also sponsors speakers who have expertise on drug and/or alcohol use. Other activities are planned to create an awareness of the effects of drugs and alcohol, and how these behaviors affect learning and working. Below are some telephone numbers where more information on drugs and alcohol can be received.

Local and National Hotline Numbers for Drug/Alcohol Information:

National

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (opens in new window)

1-800-662-HELP (4357)

In Davidson County

Alcoholics Anonymous (opens in new window) 336.24906636 

Alcohol & Drug Services (ADS) 336.882.2125

Davidson County Mental Health 336.474.2700

Partnership for a Drug Free NC 336.236.7278

In Davie County

Alcoholics Anonymous (opens in new window) 704.636.1361

Behavioral Health of Davie County (opens in new window) 336.753.6440 

Adopted: April, 2020

Legal Reference: 21 CFR Part 1308; 34 CFR 86; N.C.G.S. 90-86, et seq.

STUDENT COMPLAINT POLICY 5.3.5

  1. COMPLAINT PROCESS OVERVIEW

In order to maintain a harmonious and cooperative environment between and among the College and its students, the College provides for the settlement of problems and differences through an orderly complaint procedure. Every student shall have the right to present his/her problems or complaints free from coercion, restraint, discrimination or reprisal. This Policy provides for prompt and orderly consideration and determination of student problems and complaints by College administrators and ultimately the President.

A complaint is any matter of student concern or dissatisfaction with the College’s control except: (a) student discipline matters regarding academic and non-academic violations (Policy 5.3.2 - Student Conduct); (b) discrimination and unlawful harassment, including sexual harassment and sexual violence (Policy 5.3.4 - Discrimination and Unlawful Harassment); (c) a grade appeal (Policy 5.2.5 - Grade Appeal); or (d) any other matter that has a specific complaint process outlined in that policy or procedure.

  1. COMPLAINT PROCESS
  1. Informal Complaint- Step One

In the event the alleged complaint lies with an instructor/staff member, the student must first go to that instructor/staff member and attempt to informally resolve the matter, within five (5) working days. Both the student and instructor/staff member must have an informal conference to discuss the situation and document the attempts taken to resolve the complaint at this level. In the event that the student is unsatisfied with the resolution reached at the informal conference, he/she may proceed to Step Two within ten (10) business days after the informal conference. Not proceeding to Step Two within the time period will result in the complaint not being heard and the matter being closed.

If the complaint concerns issues unrelated to a particular instructor/staff member (for example, an issue with College policy), the student can skip the informal process and proceed to Step Two.

  1. Formal Complaint- Step Two

If the complaint is not resolved at Step One (or, given the nature of the grievance, Step Two begins the process) the student may file a written complaint with the appropriate Vice President (“Vice President”), within five (5) days. The written complaint must contain, with specificity, the name of the complainant, the facts supporting the complaint and the attempt, if applicable, to resolve the complaint at the information level.

The Vice President shall review the written complaint and conduct whatever investigation, if any, is necessary to determine any additional facts that are needed to resolve the complaint. The Vice President shall provide his/her written decision within ten (10) business days after receipt of the grievance. The Vice President may extend the timeline if additional time to complete the investigation and written response is necessary.

In the event that the student is unsatisfied with the resolution reached by the Vice President, he/she may proceed to Step Three within ten (10) business days after receipt of the Vice President’s written determination. Not proceeding to Step Three within the time period will result in the complaint not being heard and the matter being closed.

  1. Appeal - Step Three

If the student is not satisfied with the Vice President’s determination, the student may appeal to the President. The appeal must be in writing, must provide a written summary of the specific facts, the basis of the appeal, and any other documentation pertinent to the matter. The President will conduct an “on the record” review and conduct any further investigation that is necessary to ascertain the facts needed to make a determination. The President may, at his/her discretion, establish a committee to further investigate the matter and make a recommendation to the President.

At the conclusion of the investigation and not later than ten (10) business days after receipt of the student’s appeal, the President shall provide a written decision to the student.

The President’s decision is final.

Adopted: April, 2020

STUDENT RIGHT TO KNOW ACT POLICY 5.4.1

Pursuant to the Student Right to Know and Campus Security Act (the “Act”), the College is required to publicly disclose relevant graduation and transfer rate information for its students. The Act is a consumer information report designed for public access to relevant graduation and transfer information to enable students to make informed decisions regarding their college choice. The College makes available to currently enrolled as well as prospective students the graduation and transfer rate for the most recent cohort of entering students based on a one-year reporting period.

The report is updated annually and is available in the office of Institutional Research and on the College’s website.

Adopted: April, 2020

Legal Reference: P.L. 101-542 - Student Right-To-Know Act

CAMPUS SECURITY REPORTING - CLERY ACT POLICY 5.4.2

  1. POLICY OVERVIEW

The College is committed to providing a safe and secure environment. The College shall comply with the Crime Awareness and Security Act of 1990, as amended by the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act.

  1. DEFINITIONS
    1. Campus Security Authority (“CSA”) is a Clery-specific term that encompasses four groups of individuals and organizations associated with an educational institution:
      1. A member of the educational institution’s police department or campus security department;
      2. Any individual(s) who has responsibility for campus security but who does not constitute a campus police department or a campus security department (e.g., an individual who is responsible for monitoring the entrance into the College’s property);
      3. Any individual or organization specified in an institution’s statement of campus security policy as an individual or organization to which students and employees should report criminal offenses. For purposes of this College, this individual is the Student Conduct Officer; and
      4. An official or someone who has significant responsibility for student and campus activities, including, but not limited to student housing, student discipline and campus judicial proceedings. An official is defined as any person who has the authority and the duty to take action or respond to particular issues on the College’s behalf.
    2. Clery Act Crimes are the following crimes that must be reported by Campus Security Authorities to law enforcement and crimes, including attempts that are listed in the College’s Annual Security Report:
      1. Murder/non-negligent manslaughter; negligent manslaughter; rape, forcible fondling, incest, statutory rape, sexual assault, domestic and dating violence; stalking; robbery; aggravated assault; burglary; motor vehicle theft; and arson;
      2. Hate Crimes: any of the above-mentioned offenses, and any incidents of larceny-theft; simple assault; intimidation; or destruction/damage/vandalism of property that was motivated by bias on race, religion ethnicity, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or disability; and
      3. Arrests and referrals for disciplinary action for weapons (carrying, possessing, etc.); drug abuse violations and liquor law violations.
    3. College Property is all the following property:
      1. Campus Grounds, Buildings and Structures - Any building or property owned by or controlled by the College within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area and used by the College in direct support of, or in a manner related to, the College’s educational purposes; and any building or property that is within or reasonably contiguous to such buildings or property that is owned by the College but controlled by another person and is frequently used by students and supports College purposes.
      2. Off-Campus and Affiliated Property - Any building or property owned or controlled by the College that is used in direct support of, or in relation to, the College’s educational purposes, is frequently used by students, and is not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the College.
      3. Public Property - All thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks, and parking facilities that are within the campus, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus.

Adopted: April, 2020

Legal Reference: 20 U.S.C. § 1092(f); 34 C.F.R. § 668.46; The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting (U.S. Department of Education Handbook (opens in new window))

CAMPUS SECURITY REPORTING - CLERY ACT PROCEDURE 5.4.2.1

  1. SAFETY AND REPORTING PROCEDURES

The College encourages all members of the College community to report suspicious or criminal activity to law enforcement as soon as possible. Crimes may be reported anonymously. In the event of a crime in progress or at any time there is a risk of harm to persons or property, call 911.

In addition, CSAs have a legal obligation to file a report of suspected criminal activity with law enforcement and with the Student Conduct Office to ensure statistical inclusion of all Clery Act Crimes in the College’s Annual Security Report when those crimes occur on or near College Property. Any individual identified by the College as a CSA shall receive notification of that designation and the requirement that the individual report information about Clery Act Crimes. Training will also be provided to all so designated persons. While CSAs must report any Clery Act Crime that comes to their attention, at the request of the victim, the victim’s identity may remain anonymous.

To promote safety and security at the College, and in compliance with the Clery Act, the College shall:

  1. Submit crime statistics to the United States Department of Education;
  2. Maintain a daily crime log (open to public inspection);
  3. Issue campus alerts to timely warn the College community when there is information that a Clery Act Crime has occurred that represents a serious or ongoing threat to campus safety;
  4. Issue emergency notifications upon the confirmation of a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health or safety of students or employees occurring on the campus. The College tests the emergency notification procedure bi-annually.
  5. Publishes and maintains an Annual Security Report containing safety and security related policy statements and statistics of Clery Act Crimes occurring on College Property. To prepare the Annual Security Report, the College collects, classifies and counts crime statistics for the three most recent calendar years. The Annual Security Report is available on the College’s website and hard copies are available through the Student Conduct Office for inspection.

Adopted: April, 2020

STUDENT RECORDS - FERPA POLICY 5.4.3

All student records must be current and maintained with appropriate measures of security and confidentiality. The College is responsible for complying with all legal requirements pertaining to the maintenance, review and release of records retained by the College.

  1. COMPLIANCE WITH FERPA RIGHTS
    1. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (“FERPA”) provides students with certain rights to privacy of their educational records and rights of access by others to their educational records. College employees are expected to fully comply with this Policy.
    2. For purposes of this Policy, “student” means an individual who is or has been in attendance at the College. It does not include persons who have not been admitted, who have been admitted but did not attend the College “Attendance” starts when the individual matriculates or complete an entry assignment by the census date of the course, whichever comes first.
  2. ANNUAL NOTIFICATION OF RIGHTS

The College shall provide every student with an annual notice of their rights under FERPA. The Office of Institutional Research is responsible for preparing and delivering this annual notice.

  1. RIGHT TO INSPECT RECORDS
    1. Students who want to inspect their education records should direct that request to the individual and within the time frame as designated in the annual notice. Records which are available for inspection shall be provided to the student during regular business hours.
    2. Students may obtain copies of their educational records if circumstances make on-site inspection impractical and the student is in good standing. When copies are provided, the student may be charged a reasonable fee for the actual copying expense.
  2. DIRECTORY INFORMATION
    1. The College may release Directory Information without student consent. The College designates the following information as Directory Information:
      1. Student’s name;
      2. Address;
      3. Major field of study;
      4. Participation in officially recognized activities and intercollegiate athletics;
      5. Weight and height of members of intercollegiate teams
      6. Dates of attendance, grade level and enrollment status; and
      7. Degrees, honors and awards received.
      8. Photos and Videos
    2. The College shall only release Directory Information to individuals and organizations that demonstrate, in the College’s opinion, a legitimate, educational interest in the information or provide a direct service to the College; however, the College shall release Directory Information to military recruiters in compliance with the Solomon Amendment unless the student specifically restricts the release of their Directory Information.
    3. Students who do not wish to have their Directory Information released to the individuals and organizations identified above shall comply with the “opt out” provisions.
  3. RELEASE OF EDUCATIONAL RECORDS
    1. The College will not release a student’s educational records, aside from Directory Information, to any third-party unless the student consents to the release or a valid, legal exception applies.
    2. Disclosures may be made to school officials which include any of the following when that person has a legitimate educational interest in having access to the information: 1) any administrator, certified staff member, or support staff member (including health, medical, safety, and security staff) employed by the College; 2) a member of the College’s Board of Trustees; 3) a contractor, consultant, volunteer, or other party to whom the College has outsourced services or functions, such as, but not limited to: an attorney, auditor, cloud storage provider, consultant, expert witness, hearing officer, law enforcement unit, investigator, insurer/insurance company adjuster, investigator, or any other claims representative, medical providers or consultants, or counselors/therapists, provided that the person is performing a service or function for which the College would otherwise use employees, is under the direct control of the College with respect to the use and maintenance of education records, and is subject to FERPA requirements governing the use and re-disclosure of PII from education records; and 4) a person serving on a committee appointed by the College, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee or other review committee.
    3. In compliance with Title IX, the College may disclose the final results of campus disciplinary proceedings in which a student respondent is charged with a violent crime or non-forcible sex offense. Upon the request of the complainant, disclosure may be made regardless of whether the respondent was found responsible. Disclosures to third parties may be made only if the student respondent is found responsible. Disclosure in this situation is limited to the name of the violator, the type of student code violation found to have occurred, and the sanction imposed by the College.
    4. The College may release a student’s educational records to the student’s parents when requested by the parents and: i) the student is listed as a dependent on the parents’ tax returns; ii) the student violated a law or the College’s policies regarding drugs and alcohol and the student is under the age of 21; or iii) the disclosure is needed to protect the health or safety of the eligible student or other individuals in an emergency situation.
  4. CORRECTING RECORDS

A student has the right to challenge an item in his/her records believed to be inaccurate, misleading or otherwise in violation of the student’s privacy rights. The student may file a complaint pursuant to Policy 5.3.6 - Student Complaint. If the final decision is that the information in the record is, in the College’s determination, not inaccurate, misleading or otherwise in violation of the privacy rights of the student, the FERPA Officer shall inform the student of the right to place a statement in the record commenting on the contested information in the record or stating why he/she disagrees with the College’s decision.

  1. MISCELLANEOUS
    1. Students who believe their rights have been violated may file a complaint with the Family Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Ave., SW, Washington D.C. 20202. Complaint must be filed within 180 days of the date of the alleged violation or the date the student knew or should have known of the alleged violation.
    2. A hold may be applied to the release of an official transcript, diploma or other information requested from an official record for a student who has an overdue indebtedness to the College. A hold may be applied for failure to comply with a disciplinary directive.
    3. The College shall only destroy student records in accordance with federal and state laws and regulations and as allowed by the Records Retention & Disposition Schedule (opens in new window) for North Carolina Community Colleges. The College shall not destroy student records if there is an outstanding request, grievance or legal matter related to those records.

Adopted: April, 2020

Legal Reference: 10 U.S.C. § 983; 20 U.S.C. § 1232g; 34 C.F.R. pt. 99

STUDENT RECORDS - FILE PROCEDURE 5.4.3.1

  1. Student Records

The College is required to maintain, at a minimum, current, complete and accurate records as allowed by the Records Retention & Disposition Schedule for North Carolina Community Colleges to show the following:

  1. An application for admission that includes the student’s educational and personal background, age and other personal characteristics.
  2. Progress and attendance including date entered, dates attended, subjects studied and class schedule. This record shall be in a form which permits accurate preparation of transcripts of educational records for purpose of transfer and placement, providing reports to government services or agencies or for such other purposes as the needs of the student might require. Such transcripts shall be in a form understandable by lay persons and educators alike. The grading system on such transcripts shall be explained on the transcript form. Subjects appearing on the transcripts shall be numbered or otherwise designated to indicate the subject matter covered.
  3. All student account ledgers shall include, at a minimum, monies owed and paid by each student, and refunds issued by the College.
  1. Inspection by State Board of Community Colleges
    1. Students’ records shall be open for inspection by properly authorized State Board officials.
    2. The College’s financial records shall be open for inspection by properly authorized State Board officials.

Adopted: April, 2020

Legal Reference: 2A SBCCC 400.11

FERPA STUDENT RIGHTS PROCEDURE 5.4.3.2

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (“FERPA”), a federal law, provides students with certain rights with respect to their education records. These rights are:

  1. The right to inspect and review education records within forty-five (45) days of the day the College receives a request for access. Students should submit to the College’s Registrar a written request that identifies the record(s) to inspect. The College’s Registrar will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the College’s Registrar, the Registrar will advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be made.
  2. The right to challenge an item in the student’s education records believed to be inaccurate, misleading or otherwise in violation of the student’s privacy rights. Students may file a complaint pursuant to Policy 5.3.6 - Student Complaint beginning at Step Three. If the final decision is that the information in the record is, in the College’s determination, not inaccurate, misleading or otherwise in violation of the privacy rights of the student, the Vice President, Student Affairs shall inform the student of the right to place a statement in the record commenting on the contested information in the record or stating why he/she disagrees with the College’s decision.
  3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records. FERPA requires that the College obtain the student’s written consent prior to the disclosure of any such information with certain exceptions. College officials with a legitimate educational interest are an exception and do not need the student’s consent. For a complete list of the disclosures that may be made without the student’s consent, see 34 CFR Part 99.31 - 99.39. Exceptions to disclosures include, but are not limited to:
    1. Organizations conducting studies;
    2. Health/safety emergencies;
    3. Under the U.S. Patriot Act;
    4. Federal, state and local authorities;
    5. Accrediting organizations;
    6. State, local or tribal welfare agencies;
    7. Educational officials with legitimate educational interest;
    8. In response to subpoenas and court orders; and
    9. In response to a lawsuit where a student names the College as a party.
  4. A College official includes any of the following when that person has a legitimate educational interest in having access to the information:
    1. Any administrator, certified staff member, or support staff member (including health, medical, safety, and security staff) employed by the College;
    2. A member of the College’s Board of Trustees;
    3. A contractor, consultant, volunteer, or other party to whom the College has outsourced services or functions, such as, but not limited to: an attorney, auditor, cloud storage provider, consultant, expert witness, hearing officer, law enforcement unit, investigator, insurer/insurance company adjuster, investigator, or any other claims representative, medical providers or consultants, or counselors/therapists, provided that the person is performing a service or function for which the College would otherwise use employees, is under the direct control of the school district with respect to the use and maintenance of education records, and is subject to FERPA requirements governing the use and re-disclosure of personally identifiable information from education records; and
    4. A person serving on a committee appointed by the College, such as a disciplinary or complaint committee or other review committee.

A College official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility.

  1. The College may release Directory Information about the student unless the student has advised the College to the contrary. The College has designated the following information as Directory Information: name; address; major field of study; participation in officially recognized activities and sports; weight and height of members of intercollegiate athletic teams, dates of attendance, grade level and enrollment status; and degrees, honors and awards received photos and videos.
    1. The College shall only release Directory Information to individuals and organizations that demonstrate, in the College’s opinion, a legitimate, education interest in the information or provide a direct service to the College; provided, however, the College shall release Directory Information to military recruiters in compliance with the Solomon Amendment unless the student specifically restrict the release of Directory Information.
    2. If the student does not want the College to disclose Directory Information described above from the student’s education records to the recipients identified above without the student’s prior written consent, the student must submit a written request to the Student Records Office.
  2. In compliance with Title IX, the College may disclose the final results of campus disciplinary proceedings in which a student respondent is charged with a violent crime or non-forcible sex offense. Upon the request of the complainant, disclosure may be made regardless of whether the respondent was found responsible. Disclosures to third parties may be made only if the student respondent is found responsible. Disclosure in this situation is limited to the name of the violator, the type of student code violation found to have occurred, and the sanction imposed by the College.
  3. The College may release a student’s educational records to the student’s parents when requested by the parents and: i) the student is listed as a dependent on the parents’ tax returns; ii) the student violated a law or the College’s policies regarding drugs and alcohol and the student is under the age of 21; or iii) the disclosure is needed to protect the health or safety of the eligible student or other individuals in an emergency situation.
  4. Students have the right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures of the School District to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is the:

Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202-5901

Questions regarding student records should be directed to the College’s Student Records Office.

Adopted: April, 2020

Legal Reference: 20 U.S.C. § 1232g; 34 C.F.R. pt. 99

STUDENT RECORDS - CONFIDENTIALITY PROCEDURE 5.4.3.3

Each area of the campus that handles student records shall establish internal procedures to protect the security and confidentiality of student information, including hard copy and digital formats. The following guidelines must be followed when accessing confidential information and student records.

  1. Hard Copy Data
    1. Student information with social security numbers and birth dates shall not to be placed on hard copy file folder labels (use student ID instead).
    2. Student information with social security numbers and birth dates should not be left unsecured at any time.
    3. File folders (hard copies) containing student information with social security numbers and birth dates must be kept in a locked drawer or a locked room with access only by appropriate personnel.
    4. Any documents containing student information that is confidential should be shredded before discarding.
    5. Interoffice mail containing sensitive student information shall be sent using a sealed, opaque envelope.
    6. Sensitive information shall be mailed First Class or using other traceable delivery service and using an opaque envelope with no markings that will distinguish it as sensitive information.
  2. Electronic Data
    1. Electronic data shall be maintained by ITS and shall be backed up to a separate location daily.
    2. Electronic student and confidential information is only accessible to appropriate personnel in accordance with procedures approved by ITS.
    3. Access to information systems is only given to appropriate personnel upon permission by a staff member’s supervisor. Permission records will be maintained by ITS.
    4. Personnel who have been granted authority to access student information will be issued an ID and password by ITS to access information systems.
    5. Each staff member is only to use his/her designated ID and password to access student and confidential information. Under no circumstances should an ID and password be shared or should a staff member access College information systems under an ID and password that has not been issued to him or her.
    6. Student information with social security numbers and birth dates shall not be distributed or transmitted through email or otherwise made accessible to users without authority to see this information.
    7. The student ID generated by the College’s operating system will be used in place of the social security number for identification purposes and in all communications.
    8. ITS reserves the right to revoke all privileges to information systems if College Information Technology policies and procedures are not followed.
    9. Faxing of sensitive student information shall be done by first verifying the fax number.
  3. Student Communications
    1. Students are required to create a unique password upon setting up their accounts in the College’s information systems.
    2. Electronic communication with an active student should only be sent to that student’s College email address. Communication with prospective students or past students may be sent to the student’s personal email, but should not include any sensitive information (e.g., student grades).
    3. When communicating with students regarding technical support, registration, transcripts, financial aid and financial information, students should not be asked for a social security number or birth date in public/within hearing distance of other people.
    4. Two forms of authentication must be requested when verbally verifying student identification. Staff should ask questions whose responses would most likely be known only by the student (i.e. a grade on a recent assignment or name of recently attempted or registered course). In addition, other appropriate forms of authentication are the student College ID number, and birth date. Under no circumstances should a student be requested to verify his/her social security number through email.
  4. Security Breach
    1. Any security breach or loss of records should be reported to one’s immediate supervisor immediately upon discovery of the breach/records loss.
    2. Any student that has had their sensitive information compromised shall be contacted within 24 hours via telephone. In the event that the student cannot be reached, the College will try to establish communications with the student through other means. After the College has exhausted these resources, the next form of contact will be First Class mail or other traceable delivery service.
    3. While sensitive student information is in transport to the College, the information shall remain locked in the trunk or other secure area of the vehicle. If the vehicle does not have a secure location, the sensitive student information must not be transported until the information can be transported securely unless it will be transported with no stops that will require the vehicle to be left unattended.
    4. Any student information that is collected off-campus or after campus hours shall remain in the custody of the student, agency or business until the sensitive student information can be delivered to the College.
    5. With the exception of coursework to be graded, no College employee will have hard copies of sensitive student information in their possession overnight without prior approval from that employee’s supervisor or the college president. Any digital records removed from campus should be encrypted and password protected.

Adopted: April, 2020

USE OF STUDENT WORK POLICY 5.4.4

As a condition of enrollment at the College, the student grants the College a non-exclusive, perpetual, world-wide, royalty-free right and license to reproduce and publicly or privately display, distribute, or perform the student’s work, in whole or in part, for the College’s own educational purposes. This includes:

  1. The use of student work in order to demonstrate compliance with accrediting bodies.
  2. Research conducted by College personnel and presentation or publication resulting from such research.
  3. The use of student work in order to demonstrate student and instructor activities for the purposes of promoting the college and its endeavors.

Nothing herein permits the disclosure of a student’s educational record, including student grades, nor can student work be presented in a personally identifiable manner without the student’s exclusive permission. This license does not extend to commercialization of the work. Intellectual property created by the student for commercial purposes singularly or in cooperation with the College shall be governed by the Policy 4.2.1 - Intellectual Property.

Adopted: April, 2020

SERVICE ANIMALS AND OTHER ANIMALS ON CAMPUS POLICY 5.4.5

  1. OVERVIEW

In accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and other applicable federal and state law, the College may be required to accommodate an otherwise qualified individual with a disability by making a reasonable modification in its services, programs or activities. This Policy addresses the use of Service Animals and other animals on campus by qualified individuals with disabilities or individuals authorized to provide training.

  1. DEFINITIONS
    1. Emotional Support Animal - an animal selected or prescribed to an individual with a disability by a healthcare or mental health professional to play a significant part in a person’s treatment process (e.g., in alleviating the symptoms of that individual’s disability). An emotional support animal does not assist a person with a disability with activities of daily living and does not accompany a person with a disability at all times. An emotional support animal is not a “Service Animal”.
    2. Service Animal - an animal that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual or other mental disability. The work or tasks performed by a Service Animal must be directly related to the handler’s disability. Examples of work or tasks include, but are not limited to, assisting individuals who are blind or have low vision with navigation and other tasks, alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to the presence of people or sounds, providing nonviolent protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, assisting an individual during a seizure, alerting individuals to the presence of allergens, retrieving items such as medicine or the telephone, providing physical support and assistance with balance and stability to individuals with mobility disabilities, and helping persons with psychiatric and neurological disabilities by preventing or interrupting impulsive or destructive behaviors. Service Animals may or may not have been licensed by a state or local government or a private agency. Service Animals are limited to service dogs and, in some cases, miniature horses.
    3. Pets - any animal that is not an Emotional Support Animal or a Service Animal.
    4. Curriculum Approved Animal - any animal used for approved curriculum programs.
  2. ANIMALS ON CAMPUS

Animals and pets are not permitted on property owned or leased by the College, on campus grounds, in facilities and may not be left in vehicles on College property. There are occasions when a student or employee may need to bring an animal onto campus for the purpose of meeting an educational objective. Such requests should be made to the appropriate academic administrator prior to the animal being allowed onto campus. Subject to the Procedures 5.4.5.1 of this policy, Emotional Support Animals and Service Animals are permitted in any area of campus where employees or students are permitted, with a few exceptions for health and safety reasons.

Adopted: April, 2020

Legal Reference: Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990; Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973

SERVICE ANIMALS AND OTHER ANIMALS ON CAMPUS PROCEDURE 5.4.5.1

  1. PROCEDURES REGARDING SERVICE/ EMOTIONAL SUPPORT ANIMALS
    1. Responsibilities of the Service/Emotional Support Animal Owner/Handler
      1. Registration
        1. Service Animals

Students and employees are not required to register Service Animals. However, they are encouraged to notify the Disability Access Services Office (students) or the Office of Human Resource Services (employees) if they intend to use a Service Animal on campus so that appropriate College officials are aware of the animal’s presence and to assist with the Service Animal’s access to areas within the College’s campus. Visitors with Services Animals are not required to register their animals.

  1. Emotional Support Animals

After the College has made a determination that an Emotional Support Animal is allowed on campus (see Section B.2), the student or employee must register the animal with the Disability Access Services Office (students) or the Office of Human Resource Services (employees).

  1. Care and Supervision
    1. The care and supervision of a Service/Emotional Support Animal is the responsibility of the animal’s owner and/or handler. The handler must ensure the animal is in good health and has been inoculated and licensed in accordance with local regulations with the burden of proving licensure and inoculation on the person with a disability. Dogs must wear a rabies tag at all times.
    2. The Service/Emotional Support Animal must be under the control of the handler at all times and may not be left alone. A Service/Emotional Animal must be restrained by a leash or other appropriate device that does not exceed six (6) feet in length. In situations where a leash or other device interferes with a Service Animal’s ability to perform its task or service, the Service Animal must remain under the control of the handler at all times.
    3. The owner and handler of the Service/Emotional Support Animal is responsible for any damage of personal property or any injuries to an individual caused by the Service/Emotional Support Animal.
    4. The handler must ensure the animal is “housebroken” and trained and must clean up and remove all animal waste created by the animal.
    5. The Service/Emotional Support Animal may not disrupt the operation of the College or any class.
  1. Responsibilities of the College Community
    1. Service Animals

If the need for a Service Animal is obvious, College officials may not question the presence of the animal on campus. If the need for a Service Animal is not obvious, College officials are permitted to ask the handler two questions

  1. Is the animal required because of a disability?
  2. What work or task(s) has the animal been individually trained to perform?

At no time may a College official require a Service Animal to demonstrate the tasks for which they have been trained nor may they inquire as to the nature of the individual’s disability.

If another person on campus has a covered disability under the ADA and it includes an allergic reaction to animals and that person has contact with a Service Animal, a request for accommodation should be made by the individual to the Director of Human Resources (if an employee) or the Disability Access Services Office (if a student). All facts surrounding the concern will be considered in an effort to resolve the concern and provide reasonable accommodation for both individuals.

  1. Emotional Support Animals

The determination of whether a student or employee with a disability is allowed to have an Emotional Support Animal on campus shall be made on a case-by-case basis. Students and employees may request, as a reasonable accommodation for a disability, the need to have an Emotional Support Animal on campus. The College is not required to grant reasonable accommodations that would result in a fundamental alternation of a program or would constitute an undue burden. Any requests for a reasonable accommodation for an Emotional Support Animal shall be directed to the Disability Service Office (students) or the Office of Human Resource Services (employees).

In determining request for accommodations for an Emotional Support Animal, the consideration is: 1) does the person have a disability (i.e., a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities); 2) does the Emotional Support Animal perform tasks or services for the benefit of the person or provide emotional support that alleviates one of more of the identified symptoms or effects of the person’s existing disability; and 3) is the request an undue burden on the College or does it fundamentally alter a College program.

If another person on campus has a covered disability under the ADA and it includes an allergic reaction to animals and that person has contact with an Emotional Support Animal, a request for accommodation should be made by the individual to the Director of Human Resources (if an employee) or the Disability Access Services Office (if a student). All facts surrounding the concern will be considered in an effort to resolve the concern and provide reasonable accommodation for both individuals.

  1. Removal of Service/Emotional Support Animals

The College has the authority to remove a Service/Emotional Support Animal from its facilities or properties if the Service/Emotional Support Animal becomes unruly or disruptive, unclean and/or unhealthy, and to the extent that the animal’s behavior or condition poses a direct threat to the health or safety of others or otherwise causes a fundamental alteration in the College’s services, programs, or activities.

It is a Class 3 misdemeanor “to disguise an animal as a service animal or service animal in training”. N.C.G.S. § 168-4.5. In other words, it is a crime under North Carolina law to attempt to obtain access for an animal under the false pretense that it is a Service Animal.

Additionally, any employee or student who violates any portion of this procedure is subject to disciplinary action.

Adopted: April, 2020

STUDENT CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS POLICY 5.4.6

  1. Overview

The College provides extracurricular activities for students since the College believes that such activities contribute to the overall growth and educational development of an individual. Students are expected to exhibit high standards of responsible citizenship during all College functions whether on or off campus. The student activity program is a part of the educational experience available to all students. Admission for all student activities shall be non-discriminatory. Student clubs and organizations include athletics, leadership, curriculum-related organizations, personal interest clubs, service organizations and honor societies.

  1. Student Government Association
    1. The Student Government Association (“SGA”) is made up of representatives from the student body. The SGA coordinates student activities and serves as the student body’s official voice. The President of the SGA is a non-voting member of the College’s Board of Trustees.
    2. The SGA’s organizational documents shall be updated and shall be on file with the Director, Student Life and Leadership

Any revisions to the SGA’s organizational documents shall be reviewed and approved by the College President.

  1. State funds cannot be used for athletics or other extracurricular activities; therefore, almost all student activities are established and maintained by SGA funds. Almost all student activities and SGA funds derived from… a portion of student activity fees. The SGA budget will be approved by the SGA and submitted for approval to the Vice President, Student Affairs and the Board of Trustees. Once approved, no further approvals for expenditure of funds will be required by the SGA unless changes to the budget are adopted. All expenditures of funds must still be approved by the Director, Student Life and Leadership.
  1. Other Student Clubs and Organizations
    1. The College maintains that extracurricular activities complement the academic programs and enrich the college environment. Students are encouraged to participate in all phases of the student activities program as long as such participation is consistent with sound educational practices.
    2. The following criteria must be considered by clubs who seek recognition as an official, registered College student organization:
      1. The organization must serve an area of student activity need;
      2. The membership provisions must not exclude anyone because of his/her race, color, pregnancy, religion, sex, gender, national origin, age, disability, gender identity or expression, political affiliation, veteran status or sexual orientation;
      3. The membership and officers are currently registered students of the College.
      4. The organization must agree to abide by the College’s policies and administrative procedures and the Student Organization Handbook;
      5. The organization’s purpose must be compatible with the College’s philosophy and educational objectives; and
      6. Such other reasonable rules and regulations required by the President.
  1. Registered Student Organizations. Only officially registered clubs and organizations are allowed to function on the College’s campuses. In order to be officially registered, the organization must complete an application and submit the organization’s constitution and by-laws to the Office of Student Life.
  1. Fundraising

The President, in consultation with the Vice President, Student Affairs, shall establish rules and regulations regarding student clubs and organizations’ fundraising activities. In addition to such rules and regulations, student clubs and organizations are limited as follows:

  1. Raffles - The North Carolina General Statutes consider raffles as a form of gambling and are generally unlawful in the state of North Carolina. However, there is an exception that allows two (2) raffles per year for each tax-exempt non-profit organization. The total cash prizes offered or paid by any exempt non-profit organization may not exceed ten thousand dollars ($10,000) in any calendar year.

Student clubs and organizations are encouraged to use alternative methods of fundraising aside from raffles.

  1. Food - Unless clubs and organizations have prior, written permission from the President or designee, clubs and organizations may only sell pre-packaged food items, professionally prepared food items prepared by a permitted entity, pre-wrapped items and beverages in sealed containers and must comply with all local Health Department regulations. Examples of these items include bottled/canned soft drinks, pre-wrapped sub sandwiches, wrapped/packaged desserts, etc. Muffins or cookies must be pre-packaged. The sale of food prepared or assembled at point of sale, such items as tacos, hot dogs, chili, sandwiches, etc. is prohibited unless prior authorization by the President or designee. The sale of potentially hazardous foods as described in 15A NCAC 18A .2635(9) shall not be allowed.

Pursuant to N.C.G.S. § 130A-250(7), the College, as a tax-exempt entity, is exempted from temporary food establishment permitting requirements for preparing or serving food or drink, for pay, no more frequently than once a month for a period not to exceed two consecutive days.

Adopted: May, 2020

Legal Reference: N.C.G.S. §§ 14-309.15, 130A-250(7); 15A NCAC 18A .2635(9)

INTERCOLLEGIATE STUDENT ATHLETICS POLICY 5.4.7

Students participating in the College intercollegiate athletic programs shall satisfy the same admissions criteria and academic retention policies as outlined for all students. Participating students must satisfy the eligibility requirements of the National Junior Collegiate Athletic Association (NJCAA) to participate in the athletic program and must meet the same standards of eligibility for financial aid as other students. Athletic scholarships may be offered by the College for students participating in intercollegiate athletics in accordance with NJCAA rules and College policy. Student athletes are expected to abide by all College policies and procedures and athletics rules and regulations. Violations may result in suspension from the College’s athletic program, depending the offense, further disciplinary action pursuant to College policy.

The College shall maintain membership in good standing with the NJCAA. No state funds shall be used to create, support, maintain or operate an intercollegiate athletics program. Financial support for the College’s intercollegiate athletic programs shall be provided from student activity fees, College discretionary funds and foundation funds. Except for temporary room and board associated with specific athletic events, the College shall neither provide, nor offer, room and board as part of an intercollegiate athletic scholarship to any student participating in an intercollegiate athletics sport.

The Director of Athletics and Wellness (“Director”) has the responsibility for organizing and administering the athletic program, hiring coaches and scheduling games and matches. The Director shall prepare and submit budget requests annually to the College.

The College’s athletic program currently consists of men’s basketball; women’s volleyball; and men’s and women’s golf. All intercollegiate athletic activities shall be conducted in accordance with NJCAA rules and regulations.

Adopted: April, 2020

Legal Reference: 1B SBCCC 600.99; 1E SBCCC 700.2; 1H SBCCC 200.9

INCLEMENT WEATHER/EMERGENCY CLOSINGS POLICY 3.2.11

During situations such as natural disasters, emergencies and/or inclement weather, the President has the discretion to alter the College’s operating schedule as needed.  The President shall take steps necessary to deal with the situation and notify College employees.

  1. Use of Leave
  1. If the President closes the College as a result of adverse weather or emergency, no employees will be required to take any leave.  Essential employees (i.e., security, grounds, maintenance, etc.) who are required to work on closed days will be provided with comparable time-off at a later date with supervisor approval.
  2. Curriculum employees (adjunct) compensated on an hourly basis will not be paid for any time the College is closed for weather or emergency conditions.  The instructor must make every effort to reschedule the class.  If the class cannot be rescheduled, the employee’s compensation will be adjusted to reflect the lost hours.  If  a class cannot be rescheduled, an hourly, curriculum employee may make up the instructional time in another way, such as additional assignments and extended office hours.  The employee must complete the “Makeup of Lost Instructional Time” form to complete this process.
  3. If the College is open but the employee believes s/he cannot make it to the designated work site safely, the employee will be required to do one of the following:
  1. Make-up the time on a schedule approved by the employee’s immediate supervisor, if feasible;
  2. Take annual, bonus or compensatory leave;
  3. Payroll deduction for time lost, if no leave is available.
  1. Loss of Instructional Time

Coursework for missed academic classes due to inclement weather or an emergency closing will be made-up in one of the following ways:

  1. Rescheduling the course at a time convenient to the faculty and students;
  2. Documenting make-up through the use of an alternate assignment, providing content for missed classes (such as lecture notes), or scheduling small group conferences with students (the employee must complete the “Makeup of Lost Instructional Time” form to complete this process); or
  3. Extending the semester by the time missed or scheduling classes on non-instructional days.

Adopted: November, 2019

INCLEMENT WEATHER/EMERGENCY CLOSINGS PROCEDURE 3.2.11.1

  1. Media Announcements

Every effort will be made to make announcements regarding adverse weather/emergency closings or delays as early as possible. Decisions impacting day classes will be made by 6:00 a.m. or earlier if possible. Decisions about evening classes will be made by 4:00 p.m, if not earlier. In the absence of such an announcement, the College will be operating on its usual schedule.

Early College students should follow the county/city schools’ schedule. However, if the College is open, EC students should make every effort to attend their College classes.

Announcements regarding closures, or delayed schedules, will be posted on the College’s website and on local TV stations, college social media sites, and the college’s mass alert system.  If the College is closed, employees designated as essential personnel shall report to work.

  1. “Non-exempt personnel designated as essential personnel are entitled to compensatory time as outlined in Policy 3.1.4 in the Faculty Staff Handbook. Essential personnel unable to report to work are required to take annual leave or compensatory time.
  1. Delayed Openings.

For a delayed opening, the College will announce the time in which the College shall open. All employees should report by the announced opening time and should contact their supervisor if they are unable to attend work or will be later than the opening time. Employees unable to attend will be required to use leave or compensatory time.

Classes that are scheduled at the time the College opens will meet for the remainder of the scheduled class or lab time. For example, the College will open at 10 a.m. For a class beginning at 9:30 and ending at 11:00, the class would begin at 10:00 a.m. and meet until 11:00a.m.

Adopted: November, 2019

Cross Reference: Procedure 2.1.11.1

COMMUNICABLE DISEASES AND OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE TO BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS POLICY 3.4.5

  1. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE

Communicable diseases, those that have serious effects on human health, can pose a threat to the College community. The College will take all reasonable measures to ensure the safety of members of the College community during global and local infectious disease events. “Communicable disease” is defined as an illness due to a specific infectious agent or its toxic products that arises through transmission of that agent or its products from an infected person, animal, or reservoir to a susceptible host, either directly, or indirectly through an intermediate plant or animal host, vector, or the inanimate environment. Examples of communicable disease include, but are not limited to, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), chicken pox, hepatitis, measles, tuberculosis, meningitis, mononucleosis, whooping cough, and other viral diseases that reach a pandemic level, and for purposes of this Policy only, those communicable diseases which constitute a disability pursuant to the Americans with Disabilities Act.

The College shall not exclude individuals diagnosed with communicable diseases from participation in College programs or activities unless a determination is made that the individual presents a health risk to himself/herself or others. The College shall consider the educational or employment status of those individuals diagnosed with a communicable disease on a case by case individual basis.

  1. Procedure
  1. All information and records that identify a person as having a communicable disease shall be strictly confidential.
  2. Disclosure of medical information shall be made by the President only to those on a need-to-know basis to protect the welfare of persons infected with a communicable disease or the welfare of other members of the College community.
  3. Unauthorized disclosure of medical information by an employee of the College is prohibited. Violation of this prohibition may result in the suspension from, or termination of an individual’s employment with the College.
  4. A person who knows or has a reasonable basis for believing that s/he is infected with a communicable disease is expected to seek expert advice about his/her health circumstances and is obligated ethically and legally to conduct himself/herself responsibly toward other members of the College community.
  5. Faculty and staff of the College and employees of contractors or contracted services who are infected with a communicable disease are urged to notify the appropriate Administrator so that the College can respond appropriately to his/her health needs. Students are urged to share information with the appropriate Administrator for the same reason.
  6. A person infected with a communicable disease (including the AIDS virus whether active AIDS, AIDS-Related Complex, or undetectable viral load) will not be excluded from enrollment or employment or restricted in his/her access to the College’s services or facilities unless, in individual cases, the College administration determines that exclusion or other restrictions are necessary for the health and welfare of others at the College.
  7. Included in making decisions in individual cases which restrict access to employment shall be the College President, Legal Counsel for the College, the appropriate Administrator, the individual’s personal physician, the local Health Director (or designee) and if necessary, another physician with expertise in managing communicable disease cases.
  8. The College shall provide information regarding communicable diseases, especially AIDS.
  1. Public Health Incidents

Should influenza, or any other communicable disease, reach a pandemic level, the President shall regularly monitor the situation by communicating with federal, state and/or local health officials and by reviewing media sources.

Should any communicable disease reach a pandemic level within or near the College’s service area, the President, after consulting with local, state or federal health officials, may take the following actions if it is determined to be in the best interest of the College community to prevent the spread of the communicable disease:

  1. Close the College or certain College buildings and/or programs temporarily;
  2. Limit or prohibit employee travel and/or student field trips;
  3. Prohibit those infected with a communicable disease from coming onto the College campus;
  4. To the extent allowed by law, requiring or encouraging employees and students to receive immunizations (not already required by the College) that prevent the spread of a communicable disease before coming back onto the College campus; and
  5. Other specific actions deemed necessary for the safety of the College community. The President shall not quarantine any student or employee while on campus unless the quarantine is ordered by local, state or federal health officials. Persons who are infected with a communicable disease that has reached a pandemic level, or know of someone in the College community who is infected, should contact College officials immediately.

Students should contact the Dean of Student Engagement and Completion and employees should contact the Human Resources Office for reporting under this policy.

Any actions undertaken pursuant to this policy will be in accordance with applicable federal and state laws, College policies, and in the best interest of all parties.

  1. OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE TO BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS

The College shall comply with federal regulations and state statutes regarding bloodborne pathogens as set forth in the Federal Register, 29 CFR §1910.1030, and the North Carolina Administrative Code, 10A NCAC 41A, by attempting to limit/prevent occupational exposure of employees to blood or other potentially infectious bodily fluids and materials that may transmit bloodborne pathogens and lead to disease or death.

  1. Reasonably Anticipated Occupational Exposure

An employee who could “reasonably anticipate” as a result of performing required job duties, to face contact with blood, bodily fluids or other potentially infectious materials is covered by the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard, the North Carolina Administrative Code, and this Policy. “Occupational Exposure” includes any reasonably anticipated skin, eye, mucous membrane or parenteral (brought into the body through some way other than the digestive tract) contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials that may result from the performance of an employee’s duties. “Good Samaritan” acts, such as assisting a co-worker or student with a nosebleed would not be considered “reasonably anticipated occupational exposure.”

  1. Universal Precautions

Universal precautions will be in force at all times. All blood, body fluid and other potentially infectious material will be handled as if infected. The program standards for the control of potential exposure to HIV and HBV as outlined in the OSHA Rule “Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens” Standard 1910.1030, the NC Administrative Codes, or the most current standards available will be followed.

  1. Testing

An employee who suspects that s/he has a blood or body fluid exposure may request to be tested, at the College’s expense, provided that the suspected exposure poses a significant risk of transmission as defined in the rules of the Commission for Health Services. The HIV and HBV testing of a person who is the source of an exposure that poses a significant risk of transmission will be conducted in accordance with 10A NC Administrative Code 41A .0202 (4) (HIV) and 41A .0203(b)(3) (HBV). The College will strictly adhere to existing confidentiality rules and laws regarding employees with communicable diseases, including HIV or HIV-associated conditions.

  1. Exposure Control Compliance

The College shall comply with OSHA Regulation 29 CFR 1910.1030 and promote a healthy and safe environment for both employees and students. The College proposes to do this through minimizing the risk of transmission of infectious diseases that are blood or body fluid borne. To achieve compliance with OSHA Regulation 29 CFR 1910.1030, the College will maintain an  Exposure Control Plan covering the following areas:

  1. 1. Procedures,
  2. 2. Protective equipment,
  3. 3. Hepatitis vaccinations,
  4. 4. Post-exposure and follow-up care, and
  5. 5. Training.

A copy of the Exposure Control Plan is available in the office of Administrative Services.

Adopted: March, 2020

Legal Reference: 29 CFR §1910.1030; 10A NCAC 41A; 10A NC Administrative Code

41A .0202 (4) (HIV) and 41A .0203(b)(3) (HBV)

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES POLICY 7.4

It is the College’s intent to provide efficient services for its employees, students and for the public. The Board of Trustees (“Board”) encourages College officials and students to use electronic means, especially electronic mail, when conducting College business when those means result in efficient and improved service.

The Board encourages the acceptance of electronic signatures in e-mails from college campus accounts. An electronic signature is defined as any electronic process signifying an approval to terms, and/or ensuring the integrity of the document, presented in electronic format.

Students may use electronic signatures to register, check financial aid awards, pay student bills, obtain unofficial transcripts, update contact information, log into campus computers, complete forms, submission of class work, tests, etc. Employees may use electronic signatures for submitting grades, viewing personal payroll data, logging into campus computers, accessing protected data through the administrative computing system and custom web applications provided by the College, etc.

College employees are authorized to use an electronic signature to sign contracts, purchase orders, grant applications and other electronic documents to the same extent the employee is authorized to sign a hard copy of the document.

Acceptance of an electronic signature requires either of the following:

  1. Campus Network Username and Password
  1. The username is provided by the College;
  2. The user selects his or her own password; and
  3. The user logs into the secure site using the username and password credentials.
  1. User Login Identification (ID) and Personal Identification Number (PIN)
  1. The College provides user with a unique login ID;
  2. The user selects his or her PIN; and
  3. The user logs into the secure site using both the login ID and PIN.
  1. E-mail Confirmation for Class Enrollment
  1. Instructors, program coordinators/directors may accept an e-mail message from a student to confirm enrollment in a course.

College user accounts are to be used solely by the student or employee assigned to the account. Users may not allow access to their accounts by other persons, including relatives or friends. All users are responsible for protecting the confidentiality of their account and for adhering to Policy 7.2 - Internet and Network Acceptable Use.

Adopted: May, 2020

Learning Competencies

Learning competencies are embedded in each associate degree program at the College. Each competency is equally important for the success of our graduates as they pursue careers and further study.

  1. Communicate effectively.
  2. Think critically.
  3. Demonstrate information literacy.
  4. Demonstrate interdependence.

Students Enrolling in External Instruction

Davidson County Community College offers a number of courses defined as “external instruction” for regularly enrolled students to meet program requirements. “External instruction” is defined as instruction received at a site or sites to which a student is sent by the College to participate in instructional activities. Within the scope of “external instruction” is practical training, which includes cooperative education courses, internships, directed practice, and clinical practicums. External instruction also includes hybrid and online instruction as well as traditional face-to-face experiences. The purpose of external instruction is to provide students practical occupational experience as an integral part of their formal education and to provide students with alternative means of scheduling educational experiences.

Academic Honors

Dean’s List

For the purpose of honoring the student for outstanding scholastic achievement, the College publishes a Dean’s List shortly after the end of each fall and spring semester. A student who has completed at least twelve semester hours of college-level course credit in a given semester and who has achieved a grade point average of at least 3.50 on all work attempted with no grade lower than a “C” in that same semester are placed on the Dean’s List. Students with an “Incomplete” grade in a given semester are not eligible for the Dean’s List.

Phi Theta Kappa

Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) is a national scholastic fraternity holding the same status in the community college that Phi Beta Kappa carries in senior colleges and universities. To be eligible for membership, a student must

  1. be enrolled unconditionally in an Associate in Arts, Associate in Science, Associate in General Education, or Associate in Applied Science degree program;
  2. have successfully completed a minimum of 12 semester hours by the end of the fall semester;
  3. have attained a 3.6 or higher cumulative grade point average; and
  4. possess outstanding traits of character and citizenship.

Students meeting these requirements are notified of their selection in the spring and invited to join PTK. Those applying to join PTK are accepted into membership at a special induction ceremony. Students who join will receive a notation of membership on their college transcript upon graduation.

Scholar of Global Distinction Award

Students who complete each of the following will be eligible to receive the Scholar of Global Distinction Award, which will be documented on their transcript.

  1. Globally Intensive Courses: Students will complete 15 credits in courses approved as having globally intensive content.
  2. International Activities: Students will participate in at least two international events per semester for a total of eight.
  3. Global Experience: Students will participate and provide appropriate documentation in 30 hours of global experience. Students may meet the requirement through travel abroad or domestic intercultural experience/service.

A Global Scholars Advisor will assist students in meeting the requirements. Globally intensive courses will be listed on the DCCC International Education web page on the College’s website.

Readmission to Health, Wellness & Public Safety Programs

Re-entry into a Health, Wellness, and Public Safety program is contingent upon space being available in the class, lab, or clinical component of the program and faculty resources. Qualified applicants re-enter with appropriate placement as determined by the applicant’s prior academic record and/or curriculum changes. Readmission to a program is determined by the program director and/or the dean responsible for the program, is limited to one time, and must be initiated with a letter from the student requesting program reinstatement.

  • Associate Degree Nursing
  • Cancer Information Management
  • Central Sterile Processing
  • Cosmetology
  • Esthetics Technology
  • Emergency Medical Science
  • Health Information Technology
  • Human Services Technology
  • Medical Assisting
  • Medical Laboratory Technology
  • Nurse Aide (Career &College Promise)
  • Pharmacy Technology
  • Practical Nurse Education
  • Surgical Technology
  • Therapeutic Massage

Change of Major/Program of Study

If a student decides to change their program of study, the student should discuss the program change with their academic advisor. The intent is to ensure well-informed decision-making and an awareness of how program changes may affect the student’s enrollment.

When a student changes programs, the program grade point average (GPA) will be recomputed at the time of graduation to reflect only those specific courses applicable to the new program.

Multiple Majors Policy

Once a student has chosen a major, they will be assigned to every program of study (credential) that falls within that major. A student who wishes to pursue programs of study with different majors must seek approval from their academic advisor. A student will have only one primary major even though they may have multiple majors. During a term, the student’s academic advisor will require the student to take all courses possible in the primary major before allowing registration in courses in other majors. Appeals of the academic advisor’s decision must be made in writing to the School of Learning Dean associated with the student’s primary major.

Reinforced Instruction for Student Excellence (RISE)

Overview

Students entering a NC Community College will be placed by unweighted high school GPA into one of three opportunities. Students with a GPA 2.8+ may register for any class without mandatory additional supports.  Students with a GPA 2.2-2.799 may enroll in a gateway math or English course with a mandatory co-requisite.  Students with a GPA < 2.2 must enroll in a one semester transition math and/or English course.

Objective

The objective of RISE is to increase gatekeeper momentum. Over the last several years, developmental education has been reformed from semester-long courses to one-credit math modules and 8-week integrated reading and writing courses, a new placement test has been created, and the primary form of placement has been unweighted high school GPA of 2.6. Success in gateway classes has improved but not quickly enough. Goals of RISE include properly placing students into gateway level courses with or without mandated co-requisite supports, elimination of a placement test (except for students more than 10 years out of high school and other rare cases), and raising the GPA criteria from 2.6 to 2.8.

Tenets

The following tenets should guide our development decisions:

  • Improve success rates in gateway level math and English classes
  • Place more students in gateway level math and English with mandated co-requisite support
  • Provide one semester (or less) of developmental education to students entering the community college system with an unweighted high school GPA below 2.2 and more than two points below the ACT benchmarks
  • Provide student success skills, growth mindset activities, and soft skills in co-requisite and transition courses
  • Provide co-requisite courses that are aligned specifically with a student’s gateway level math and English courses
  • Strive to ensure we are able to effectively collect data and assess the efficacy of RISE
  • Eliminate placement testing, except for students more than 10 years out of high school and in other rare cases